Chocolate Coffee Fondant Cakes

“I’m starving!” Lucie flew in the door with the rain blowing in with her. “Canteen was terrible today so I only ate some baguette.”

Normally my bunnies are flexible eaters at school but somehow there are a few days in the year where apparently la cantine doesn’t even meet the I’ll-just-eat-it-because-I’m-hungry mark.  I wasn’t much better: if that had been the kids, I’d have scolded them. I’d just returned from an extra bendy weekly yoga session (feeling wobbly and stretched to 2 metres) and, having only downed a yogurt for lunch in a rush, suddenly thought of a warming yet healthily wicked, quickly-made pick-me-up.   Besides, Lucie needed energy before disappearing again for a fencing practise. Enough excuses?

chocolate coffee cakes using briochette moulds

Then Julie arrived like clockwork: dump rucksack, throw off Converse – shoelaces still done – blocking the front door and stairs. “What’s for goûter, Mum? Canteen was rubbish, so I ended up …. oooooh, what’s that amazing smell?  Chocolate?”

We like plain and simple chocolate cake, or perhaps a layered chocolate cake with ganache, but we love squidgy individual chocolate cakes when they’re fast to prepare and, even better, packed with good quality chocolate (no less than 64% cacao solids) and less sugar.  Over the years we’ve surprised ourselves, as gradually we’ve become used to reducing sugar with more bittersweet tasting chocolate in recipes after some happy sampling of the likes from the wonderful pâtisseries that Paris has to offer.

chocolate coffee fondant cakes

No fancy food photo props here.  Luckily I had a couple of minutes (yes, that’s far too long for hungry teenagers!) to attempt to focus on them with my telephone camera!

I also make lighter chocolate moelleux (lava) cakes for dessert with more eggs. What I love about this recipe, is that it’s easier on the butter than in most fondant cakes I’ve tried plus it has a more intense chocolate taste, with the coffee bringing it out even further.  A little goes a long way but boy, it’s packed with fatigue-fighting and stress-bashing magnesium! They’re dense: a perfect warm and rewarding teatime treat.

quick chocolate mocha fondant cakes with coffee glaze

Recipe Chocolate Fondant Cakes with Mocha Glaze

Adapted from part of a recipe by Jonathan Blot (one of my favourite pastry chefs, of Acide Macaron in Paris) in the 4th issue of Fou de Patisserie magazine.

Makes 6 using a non-stick silicon muffin tin or briochette mould

Preparation Time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: 6 minutes

70g butter
100g good quality chocolate (64% cocoa solids)
1/2 tsp instant coffee granules
2 eggs
50g caster sugar
30g plain (all-purpose) flour

Chocolate & Coffee Glaze

45g chocolate
20g/20ml espresso coffee

1. Preheat the oven to 180°C/160°fan (Gas mark 6).  Measure out the chocolate and butter in a heatproof bowl and place over a pan of simmering water.  Add the coffee powder and stir until just melted.

2.  Take off the heat then add the sugar and beat in the eggs until mixed together.  Add the flour in one go until completely mixed.  Place the moulds on a baking tray then spoon into non-stick (I used flexipan silicone moulds – briochette shaped) moulds. If you’re using regular muffin moulds, butter them lightly before filling with batter.

3. Bake for only 6 minutes (yes, I know it’s exact but don’t cook any more than this if you prefer them squidgy).

4. Meanwhile, make the glaze: make a small cup of espresso coffee (ideally directly into a small measuring cup).  Melt the chocolate in a bowl over a pan of simmering water.  Add the hot coffee and stir until melted then spread over each cake.

The cakes are even better eaten next day after overnight maturing.  They can last in an airtight container for up to 3 days.  You’ll see how they are dense in chocolate!  I also added thin bits of chocolate from Patrick Roger as a decoration but as the kids were wanting them quickly, they melted and oozed down the cake here…

chocolate fondant cakes with chocolate coffee glaze

Just after I made them, I noticed on Instagram that it was National Chocolate Cake Day on 27th January.  Isn’t it fun how the US celebrate treats during the year? Liz Berg had the same idea for Chocolate Cake Day, with her deliciously runny lava cakes at That Skinny Chick Can Bake. Well no wonder: they’re so quick, comforting, nourishing, easy, delicious and totally satisfying.  Next time I’ll do what I normally do and push in a square of pear in the middle of each cake before baking.  And for the perfect Valentine’s Day treat, sprinkle on golden edible lustre and top with macaron hearts!


 

A quick question: do you bake using digital scales?

I thoroughly recommend using digital scales when baking. If you’re used to ounces, it’s easy to flip the switch on scales.  If I give the equivalents in ounces in this recipe, I’m into messy-looking 3/4 oz and 2 1/4 oz etc.  Digital scales are easy to find, not expensive to snatch up and you’ll discover that your baking will have constant successful results!

Annual Burgundy French Wine Festival 2015

If you know me by now, wine and I are more than just friends.  So, when you live within 3 hours’ drive from Paris to Burgundy, the Galettes des Rois have been baked, tried and tested, and good friends ask you to join them for the annual wine festival, what would you do? So I missed Burn’s Night again this weekend for this…

Le Chateau du Clos de Vougeot Bourgogne

According to the New York Times, Burgundy is one of the top 15 destinations to travel to in 2015.  I say Burgundy, but let’s say Bourgogne, darlings. If you follow the blog, you’ll remember about the Fête de Saint-Vincent Tournante in Saint Aubin last year – so I’ll not repeat about the festival’s history and background.  This year the 71st wine festival took place in two tiny villages of the Côte de Nuits: Vougeot and Gilly-lès-Cîteaux between Dijon and Beaune.

Before the Fête started on Saturday, we kicked off the weekend for dinner.  Last to arrive at the Château Tailly (that’s what happens when you leave at 4.30pm from Paris – it takes an extra hour just to drive out of it!) our lovely friends thankfully saved some Crémant de Bourgogne apéritif and we quickly dumped our bags in the Hemingway room.  Oh, to drop everything and live like a lord and lady for the weekend… Château Tailly is a Gîte de France (details on previous blog post) and a wonderful, welcoming place to stay in Bourgogne.

Chateau de Tailly Gites de France Burgundy

Like last year, our weekend was organised by our good friend, Hervé, who is Master of Organisation Extraordinaire and thrives on it.  Toma Le Courbe, our talented chef, prepared a meal around a lobster theme: starting with a lobster claw risotto to accompany a Rully 1er Cru.  This was toe-curling!  I am definitely adding more sauce from now on to my risottos. His secret?  A dash of Cognac, tarragon and nigella seeds.

Main course was lobster tail and scallop with lightly spiced bulgur and a velvet crab (étrilles) sauce.  The best wine with this was Jean-Pierre Guyon’s Nuits Saint-Georges white (pinot blanc) – a rare occasion to enjoy this, as it’s normally a red wine.  The cheese course was a typical speciality of Burgundy – more on this with a recipe to come soon.

gourmet French menu by Toma at the Chateau Tailly Burgundy

Next morning the Ceremony officially started at 6.30am –  Chefs Toma and Marie were already bravely serving for the festival.  As the procession took place amongst the winemakers and the red-golden-robed Chevaliers de Tastevin, we visited our high profile but down-to-earth winemaker friend, Jean-Pierre Guyon.  He took us through his legendary wine tastings directly from the cellar in Vosne-Romanée.  It’s not that his winery is on the national road (la route des Grands Crus – D974) and only 20 minutes walk to Vougeot, but Domaine Guyot’s wines happen to be some of the best and purest of nectars in Burgundy.

Domaine Guyot Vosne-Romanée Burgundy wines best in France

Starting from the basic of Bourgogne reds, through to other Grand Crus such as Gevrey Chambertin, we finished off with the festival’s stars, the Clos de Vougeot and Echezeaux 2013 – still in barrels and not yet ready but boy, the flavours!  If it was a blind tasting, I was convinced I was drinking a white Mersault rather than a red Clos de Vougeot (although Mersault is not that far away from here.)  The flavours of cream and soft vanilla opened up in the mouth 10 seconds later – and that was only 2013!  Top of the ladder’s lunch was the most exquisite rillettes pâté.  Needless to say, I used the spittoon if I wanted to get through the day!  Although a couple of Grand Crus accidentally slipped down.

Domaine Guyon Ban Bourguignon

Le Ban Bourguignon …

Finishing with hands in the air with the traditional Ban Bourguignon song to thank Jean-Pierre, it was time to walk to the Fête de Saint-Vincent Tournante. Luckily I was wearing long-johns and extra thermal gloves since it was absolutely freezing!

The vines dusted with snow sprinkles, take a look at the rich soil or terroir.  With 100 appellations in Bourgogne, the Côte de Nuits has 13 Grands Crus appellations.  For this event, the Grand Crus stars were both Clos de Vougeot and Echezeaux.  What’s so incredible about the wines here is that the terroir is so different in one area to the next so, even although one appellation can be near to the other, the tastes of the wines can be so varied.

Clos Vougeot Burgundy French vineyards in winter

The history of wines here stretches back 900 years when the monks constructed buildings around the vineyards. Here it wasn’t uncommon to see 1298 like this, written on buildings. The theme this year was therefore, “On the Monks’ Trail”.  Spot the monks propped up around the two villages…

Fete de Saint Vincent Tournante 2015 Vougeot

It takes the villagers weeks to voluntarily prepare for the event, decorating buildings with paper maché flowers. This year I just bought one sampling pack (well, I’d lost Antoine!): 15€ for 7 tasting tickets, a special St Vincent 2015 glass and map.

festive window in the village Veugeot Burgundy

The French postman? Eewah, eewah, ee-always loves dropping in some letters!

The glass comes in a special pochette that hangs around the neck, so you can wander about the villages without needing your glass in hand.  Just as well, as I could no longer feel my fingers!

Clos de Vougeot Grand Cru 2013 for the Fete de Saint Vincent Tournante 2015

Clos de Vougeot Grand Cru 2013 especially made for the Fete de Saint Vincent Tournante 2015

In the end, I only tasted 2 wines: the ordinary Bourgogne and one of the two Grand Cru stars, Clos de Vougeot.  Poured into a chilled glass, fighting off the snow flakes, it wasn’t just that it was over chilled: we were spoilt by tasting Jean-Pierre’s wines beforehand.  So, I just circulated to enjoy the ambience.

The village of Vougeot is particularly picturesque: I’m returning in the summer to appreciate visiting the Château du Clos Vougeot and the neighbouring wineries.

Andouillette sausages

Toma and Marie’s stand were attracting some funny-dressed crowds, as the smell of Andouillette sausages were swirling around his tent.  It reminded me of what Ann Mah says in her book, Mastering the Art of French Eating.  I cannot for the life of me even try it.  The “fragrance” is rather overwhelming. The French mock me, saying it’s the same as our Scottish Haggis. It’s not the same thing.  So roasted chestnuts were my preferred afternoon goûter or 4 o’clock treat.

French roasted chestnuts

Then I stumbled on something, a snow storm took off and stepped back in time – to the Village des Gueux (desgueux means disgusting in French).  I was Asterix in Bourgogne.  Soup, anyone?

Village des Gueux France wine festival

Village Des Gueux

The soup was welcoming to warm frozen fingers.  Let’s say that was about it.  Motivation was strong during the long walk back in the biting winds to the mini-bus, as Toma and Marie had already left their stand and taken off to their new restaurant in Rully to prepare dinner.

Maison Le Courbe French restaurant in Rully, Burgundy

Back to civilisation, after a hot bath to defrost.  I couldn’t recommend Toma and Marie’s new restaurant any higher at the Maison Le Courbe in Rully.  The courtyard is wonderful (sorry, my photos were too poor in the dark) and would suggest you enjoy the view to the château in Rully in the summer, when the weather is more clement.

Menu Maison le Courbe Rully Burgundy

Toma’s culinary skills showed off with his entrée of an Opéra of Foie Gras, smoked duck, pain d’épices and a blackcurrant coulis.  Chicken was stuffed with snails (yes, I eat these too!  Not bad for an ex-vegetarian!) in a creamy garlic sauce.  Cheese?  I must write about this separately!  To finish off was a Paris Brest.  I’d love to do a Paris-Bourgogne soon! Inspiration indeed, Toma.

Domaine Guyon Vosne-Romanée best wines in Burgundy

At the end of the weekend, Antoine surprised me with some boxes of my favourite wines from Jean-Pierre to take back home.  You mean, you went all the way down to the cellars to get it for me? Oh baby, baby you shouldn’t have.  I’m in love…

Cheers from Bourgogne on #TravelTuesday!

Maison Le Courbe
19 rue Saint Laurent
71150 Rully
FRANCE

 

 

Camélia Restaurant in Paris by Thierry Marx

When the entrance to a restaurant is a pâtisserie known as le ‘Cake-Shop’, wouldn’t you be excited?

Camelia restaurant Thierry Marx Paris

Antoine didn’t need any sweet-talking to treat me here for lunch. It has been on my top restaurant dream list for months (OK, I’ll be honest – since 2011 when it opened) since the Chef, Thierry Marx, is one of my French super-heroes! So what was the special occasion? An early Valentine’s Day ‘surprise’. I don’t know about you, but when it comes to Valentine’s Day and eating out we avoid it and prefer to spend the evening at home over a romantic dinner with our girls. So the timing was perfect.

Calm. Cool. Cosy. The Camélia at the Hôtel Mandarin Oriental in Paris.  It’s more accessible and less sophisticated than the more chic, bigger brother restaurant, Sur Mesure.  The room is airy and light and when the weather is more clement, guests can eat in the gardens surrounded by camellias.

Entrance to Mandarin Oriental Hotel Paris

The Camélia also happens to be in one of my favourite delicious streets of Paris, Rue Saint-Honoré. If you follow me on Instragram or Facebook you’ll have a taster of Pierre Marcolini’s new chocolate boutique just a few doors down – where the macarons take pride of place – and that’s only just a few doors down again from Jean-Paul Hévin’s chocolate shop and bar.  So whoah – what a street!

First off, let me explain that when I’m in a restaurant, I don’t click and point the camera at all angles.  I also respect fellow diners, so my apologies for the lack of photos, all taken discretely with my ‘phone.

Are you ready for lunch?  On your Marx, get set, what a menu!

Mandarin Oriental Hotel Paris apéritif time

A lovely touch from the Sommelier, David Biraud, is that wines by the glass are poured at the table from impressive Magnum bottles.  Most important, however, are the wines.  The choice was excellent, even if my favourite Condrieu was out of stock but a glass of Marsannay from Burgundy had ample long-lingering creamy floral flavours, served with the most succulent olives and truffle roasted nuts.

While I was tempted to go for the chef’s speciality of squid tagliatelle on a bed of squid ink risoni, I instead opted for the lunch menu, Daily Marx. 48 euros for either starter and main or main and dessert with a choice of 2 dishes per course.  Service was swift, friendly and the staff knew the menu inside out.  Our inquisitive neighbours certainly put them through their paces, while we just sat back and took in the delicious ambience of a couple of chefs in the centre island, chopping up vegetables and preparing the more intricate parts to each dish.

Gambas prawns in bonito broth by Thierry Marx

Tiger prawns, (snackées and tempura) with blood orange, endives (chicory) and a Dashi and bonito broth.  Although this is French cuisine, the chef makes his Marx (sorry, couldn’t resist that) with Japanese influences.

The main dish was where Chef Marx really strutted his Michelin-starred stuff by transforming the classic Blanquette de Veau in the most exquisite presentation.  As in my previous post, what’s so important in this dish is the sauce – and he certainly didn’t disappoint, with extra served separately on the side.  The classic vegetables were tasty, glistening jewels and the surprise was the crispy rice.  He did, however, add some comté cheese to the rice, which is the only ingredient altering the classic dish.

Blanquette of veal by Thierry Marx chef Camelia Restaurant Paris

This may look small in portion size but, for lunch, the veal was huge!  What with the homemade bread, rolls and salted Normandy butter (yes, butter is not often served in restaurants in Paris), it was difficult to refuse.  Oh, and I also just had to try the Alsace Riesling, as the sommelier insisted suggested that it was perfect with the veal.  If you know me well, you’ll understand how I love wine tasting…

I simply couldn’t manage dessert.  However, as we were settling the bill, the tastiest little sablés shortbread biscuits arrived with the lightest of chouquettes.

Mignardises sweet treats Camelia restaurant Paris

Don’t worry. I’m not going to disappoint you. That way I’ll be back here soon to fully enjoy the cake-shop for you.  Don’t you think that merits a separate post for the perfect teatime in Paris? Hopefully next time, I may even get to meet the great man himself?

Cake shop Mandarin Oriental Paris

Well I hear snow is on its way to Paris this week.  Wish us luck, as we’re driving down to Burgundy this weekend for the Fête de Saint Vincent Tournante – coming up next week!

Camélia Restaurant
Mandarin Oriental Hotel
251 rue Saint-Honoré
75001 PARIS
Tel: 70 98 78 88

Daily Marx Menu served Monday-Friday 12h30-14h30.

Disclaimer: We were not guests of the hotel or restaurant.  This post is entirely personal and not sponsored in any way.

The French’s Favourite Casserole: Blanquette de Veau

With the Charlie Hebdo event in Paris still shocking us all profoundly, we’re definitely turning to comfort food – and this Blanquette de Veau is a real French classic at this time of year.

In the Annex of Mad About Macarons, I have suggested recipes for using up egg yolks before saving the whites for your macarons. This is one of them. Blanquette de Veau is most often translated as Veal Casserole in White Sauce.

Blanquette de beau French casserole recipe

‘White sauce’ doesn’t sound too sexy, does it?  Blanquette sounds fancier in French but the English translation just doesn’t give it justice.  It even sounds a bit bland.  To me, white sauce conjures up dull images of a plain béchamel sauce with flour, milk and butter.  This casserole couldn’t be further from plain!  For a start, there is no flour in the sauce; instead, the casserole is simply thickened by reducing the natural stock at the end and whisking in egg yolks and cream with a flourish of nutmeg and lemon juice.

Why Blanquette de Veau?

Veal Blanquette is a pure and simple French Grandmother’s dish which is passed on from family generation to generation.  It’s a casserole that’s so simple to prepare. “Blanquette” refers to the way it’s cooked: there’s no need to brown the meat beforehand; instead the veal is just placed in a large pot together with its partners in taste and, as it bubbles away merrily, you can get on with other things.

 

French blanquette de veau casserole

It’s also Antoine’s favourite casserole – as long as it’s full of flavour.  It has a rich, creamy fragrant sauce with a hint of lemon and, for me, the touch of cloves just gives it that extra touch of warmth.  When it’s packed with comfort and flavour, you can see why the French consider it their favourite national stew!  It may be seen as family fare but serve this version at a dinner party and it works – ça marche!

It only really works, however, if you carry out the necessary extra steps at the end, otherwise the taste is nothing like the real thing.  I’ve seen recipes that just use crème fraîche and don’t take the time to whisk up the classic sauce using egg yolks to complete the dish. I’ve tried them and the resulting taste is well, bland. Let’s say it’s like making a curry without any spices…

My favourite French butcher in Le Vésinet near Paris

Blanquette de Veau is from our Ile-de-France region around Paris.  My local butcher, Monsieur Le Corre, is passionate about hunting and takes great pride in his best quality meats, often showing me the simplest way to prepare some classic cuts with a different twist (I’ll post on this later).  He’s also partial to showing off his latest catch, too!  For a blanquette, ideally you’ll need a mixture of best quality veal: mainly breast and shoulder. If you can’t get good veal, then chicken will also work well (use free-range, if possible) – and I’ve also seen many fish blanquette versions too.

Take the time in the last couple of steps to thicken the sauce.  Have I stressed enough how important this is? In true lazy gourmet style, however, I cheat a bit in the recipe by using frozen pickling onions from Picard, our favourite French frozen store.

creamy veal casserole made like the French

Blanquette de Veau Recipe

Recipe slightly adapted from one of my all-time favourite cookbooks, France: The Beautiful Cookbook – Authentic Recipes from the Regions of France by The Scotto Sisters and Gilles Pudlowski.  This book is full of the French classic dishes – I’ve particularly found that the savoury dishes are spot-on each time.

Preparation Time: 35 minutes
Cooking Time: 2.5 3 hours

1.5kg veal (mixture of breast & shoulder), cut into chunks
1 onion
3 cloves
bouquet garni (1 bay leaf, 4 sprigs thyme, 3 sprigs parsley)
1 leek (white part only), sliced
2 carrots, cut into chunks
250ml white wine
150g crème fraîche
2 large egg yolks (or 3 medium)
1/2 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
grated zest of half lemon (unwaxed)

Garnish:
24 small pickling onions (or use frozen)
24 small button mushrooms (Champignons de Paris)
30g butter
1 tbsp fresh lemon juice

1. Stud the onion with the cloves.  Place the veal in a casserole dish and add the carrots, onion, leek and bouquet garni.  Pour in the wine and add just enough water to cover the meat and vegetables.  Bring to the boil, skimming the surface for the first 10 minutes of any scum.  Cover and simmer gently for 2.5 hours. 

ingredients for blanquette de beau French casserole recipe

No need to brown the meat – just place the ingredients in a pot!

2. About 45 minutes before the end of cooking, prepare the garnish.  Wash mushrooms, pat dry and cut into halves or quarters, depending on their size.  Fry them at first without any oil or butter (my tip – not in the original recipe!) in a non-stick pan until they have given out all of their juices.  This concentrates their flavour.  THEN add 25g of the butter and the lemon juice to them and set aside. Sauté the onions in a small pan with the rest of the butter until golden.

vegetable garnish for blanquette de veau

3. Lift the lid of the casserole dish and smell these flavours!  Discard the bay leaf and thyme stalks. Remove the meat and vegetables with a slotted spoon and transfer to a large serving dish, adding the mushrooms and pickling onions.  Set aside and keep warm in a cool-moderate oven.

Blanquette de Veau French veal pot casserole

4. Boil the cooking liquid over a high heat until reduced.  Meanwhile, in a bowl, hand-whisk the crème fraîche, lemon zest, yolks, grated nutmeg, and season with salt and pepper.  Blend in 3 tablespoons of the hot stock then quickly whisk in the yolk mixture back into the stock.  Stir constantly until thickened but do not boil (it will reduce its subtle flavours). Whisk until the sauce is smooth and velvety.

how to reduce sauce for a blanquette casserole

Pour the sauce over the meat and serve with basmati or Thai rice.  This dish is also lovely reheated the next day.  For busy gourmets, this dish can be prepared the day before a dinner party.  Just prepare steps one and two in advance then chill in the fridge.  Make the sauce on the day of serving and voilà!

classic blanquette de veau or French veal casserole recipe

Antoine loves to serve this with a delicate white wine, such as an Alsace Riesling or Pinot Gris, otherwise a St. Véran, Marsannay or other Burgundy will be fabulous.

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Happy New Year with a Cheesecake from Paris!

Happy New Year to you with this Orange Cinnamon Cheesecake from a chilly Paris!  I hope you all had a chance to have a good break, pick up a book now and again, stick your feet up and enjoy spending time with the family.  If you’re like me, you may have also spent much quality time in the kitchen – but it’s my favourite, cosy haven to concoct new dishes and bring out old favourites to the table, making the family happy bunnies.

Orange and cinnamon cheesecake with macarons for Teatime in Paris

A cheesecake fit for a King or Queen this Epiphany and for a macaron blog

While I’m making the traditional royal French Galettes des Rois this week for Epiphany, I’ve also had a crescendoing urge to make … cheesecake!  Julie is the greatest cheesecake fan I know –  training her eye to spot them from a distance – as New York-style cheesecakes are gradually appearing more in Parisian pâtisseries. Since her major discovery of Gontran Cherrier‘s deliciously tangy Yuzu and lime cheesecake, festive shopping trips to St Germain-en-Laye up the road have had a major attack on her pocket money. So, Mum to the rescue, it was high time to stock up on some cream cheese and make one family-sized this weekend.  Besides, I wanted to ensure she was eating enough fruit.  Excuses over.

orange cheesecake decor close-up

In my RECIPES TO DO pile, has been the most sumptuous-looking cheesecake on the 7th cover edition of Fou de Pâtisserie magazine: by Chef Jean-François Piège.  He owns Thoumieux: a restaurant, a hotel and brasserie (see my reviews here), plus one of my favourite pâtisseries in Paris, Gâteau Thoumieux – at 58 rue Saint Dominique.

Chef Piège’s ingredients’ list is precise with 401g of cream cheese, but I should have taken note in step 2 that you only need 300g of the base – I used all of it in the recipe which was too much for a 16cm diameter cheesecake mould.  The next time I make this, I’ll reduce the base by a 1/3 and add a little more butter, just to keep it better together.  However, the extra base was excellent as a crumble topping!  The cream cheese was divine – I added half the zest of an unwaxed orange, just to give it that extra tang.  He doesn’t mention this, but I recommend that your cream cheese filling ingredients are all at room temperature in order to mix well.

Teatime in Paris with cheesecake and macarons

Le Cheesecake de Gâteau Thoumieux
Orange & Cinnamon Cheesecake

Adapted recipe by Jean-François Piège and Ludovic Chaussard (Paris), extract from Fou de Pâtisserie magazine, September-October 2014 Number 7 (Cover feature).

Serves 6
Preparation Time: 45 minutes
Cooking Time: 1 hour 15 minutes

Biscuit base:

260g plain flour (type 55)
110g butter 1
55g icing/powdered sugar
1 egg
1g salt
1g orange and lemon zest
(I added 1 tsp ground cinnamon)
65g butter 2
35g soft brown sugar

Cream Cheese:

400g Philadelphia cream cheese (or St Moret, Kiri)
50g sugar
55g single cream
1 egg yolk
2 eggs
(I added the zest of half an unwaxed orange) 

Decoration:

Rose petals, coriander and parsley flowers, quenelles de mascarpone, almond streusel (According to the winter season, I instead used physallis, pomegranate jewels and my leftover macarons – over to your imagination!)

1. Make a shortcrust pastry with all the ingredients except the Butter 2 and soft brown sugar.  Bake the pastry then, using a paddle beater of a mixer, break up into pieces when cool. (I mixed all the ingredients to a crumb consistency like shortbread and baked in the oven at 160°C fan /180°C for about 15 minutes). Add the Butter 2 and brown sugar.  Mould 300g of the cheesecake biscuit round by 16cm diameter.  Set aside.

2. To make the cream, mix the Philadelphia cheese with the sugar then gradually add the yolk, eggs and cream together.

3. To finish, pour the cream mix over the base and bake at 90°C for about 1 hour 15 minutes.  Leave to cool in the fridge.  Just before serving, decorate with the above suggestions.

orange cinnamon cheesecake with macarons

Another reason to have a stock of macarons in your freezer ‘bank’!

Now that we’ve devoured plenty of sweet treats this festive season, I’m back to soups and lighter savoury delights for a few days.  All the extra courses are now beginning to hang like a brioche over the jeans, which is not so sweet!  So it’s back to the yoga tomorrow but I also fancy trying out chef Piège’s Pizza Soufflé, a popular signature dish in his brasserie.

Join me on Instragram and Facebook for a daily dose of photos from Paris and the suburbs – this week I’m sure you’ll see scenes from the French Sales (les Soldes) as of 7th January, plenty more Galette des rois cakes decorating the pastry shop windows and baking them chez vous.