I Love You, Macaron Tea – Theodor Paris

I didn’t think I’d actually fall in love with tea. Can you imagine a tea with scents of macarons and pistachios? Heaven. On top of it, this unique brew is called “I Love You” – Je t’aime.

The teas of Theodor Paris have been a very recent discovery of mine thanks to my friend, Francis for introducing me to Monsieur Leleu’s new creation, the Absolu Oolong.  And when I say discovery, it’s not just that his speciality teas are so different to anything else I’ve ever tasted; like drinking good wine, they’ve helped me learn to appreciate teas’ deliciously complex aromas; take the time and pleasure with my cuppa; (I know, I know –  this sounds corny but it’s true…) even evoke a smile.

I’m so glad I popped in to the original boutique where Theodor started in the 16th arrondissement. It’s just a few minutes walk from Trocadero and I thoroughly recommend a visit by the charming Sylvie. Previously a creamery, the decor is still testament to such a location with the ceiling and wall panels by Anselm in Rue du Roi Doré (golden king street) in the 7th.

Theodor Tea Shop Paris

Guillaume Leleu started up this first shop here in 2002 and since then has been taking the tea world by storm with his Theodor creations, now in 30 different countries. Each year about 100 tons of teas personally selected from around the world (mostly from Asia) are transformed in his zen-like laboratory in the previous Singer factory in Bonnières sur Seine, within rowing-boat distance from Monet’s gardens at Giverny.

Calling himself the Insolent Parisian, Theodor’s founder has us travel with him  – whether it’s through the descriptions of his teas or online – finding beauty in everyday things through his poetic words, embodying the art of tea.

The inspiration of the Impertinent Parisian is embodied in sixteen essences that form the aromatic tea palette in an impertinent and poetic way. Impertinent, because it tempts us to take a shortcut and welcome the unexpected. Poetic, because it makes us discover shifting horizons and jostles our view and senses, provoking us to a game of desire and astonishment in disguise, while inviting us to marvel in front of the revisited daily Parisian routine.

Theodor Paris Tea

Such impertinent essences are represented by 16 colourful satin ribbons that make a statement around each of the characteristic tea tins containing teas of origin, black flavoured teas, green flavoured teas, infusions named “weeds” or herbal teas.

Je t’aime belongs to the “Teas of the Gallantry” essence, represented with a fuchsia pink ribbon. Gallantry expresses “pastry flavours tasting like fruit and candy. They will offer a flattering and indulging pleasure while remaining light and refined.”

The day I visited, Marìa, also from the talented Theodor team, made a pot of this rather special brew.

Theodor Paris macaron pistachio tea

I Love You‘s pronounced fragrances are indeed pistachio and macaron. Like an alchemist in the kitchen or in a perfumery, Monsieur Leleu creates the macaron flavour by adding ingredients such as pink peony petals (clearly visible), bitter almond, coconut, chocolate, chopped almond pieces, and coconut shavings.

Just as with tasting wine, when the tea was finished I loved swirling around the end of the tea to gather all of the wonderful aromas around the empty, fragranced teacup.

empty teacup of macaron tea at Theodor Paris

This macaron tea has a loving green tea sister, J’aime, flavoured with notes of macaron and strawberry.

As more gigantic tea containers were opened, it was intriguing to sniff revel in the different tea leaves’ bouquets with their added surprises which make up each and every creation.

Theodor tea shop in Paris Trocadero

Jour J (meaning “The Big Day”) is aptly named, as this dreamy white tea (Bai Mu Dan) has astonishing notes to resemble the flavour and sensation of rosé Champagne. Monsieur Leleu cleverly concocts this sensation by adding bits of strawberry, helianthus (or sunflower) petals and jasmine flowers, just to name a few of the magical ingredients.

Likewise, ingredients are added to create a black tea, Sans Complexe (no complex), with lemon and vanilla to arrive at a lemon meringue pie. Tribute, conjures up the most amazing flavours of frangipane, while Oolong Milky conjures up the most buttery and milk fragrances. This list goes on …

Rooibos tea: carpe diem Theodor Paris

This Carpe Diem is red rooibos tea, with “greedy” (that’s another of the 16 essences) notes of red fruits, toasted and sugar-coated almonds. Marìa suggested using this tea to perfume rice by placing just a couple of teaspoons in it while cooking.  Try it.  It’s amazing!

Lotus flowers used for making tea

Blue Oolong Lotus is a green tea from Vietnam and the lotus flower is used to impart a scent to the tea leaves by placing them inside the flower just before it closes at night to take on the fragrance of this very special flower. How’s that for creativity?

Theodor Speciality teas in Paris

The perfect gourmet but simple teatime: a cup or two of I Love You, rose and chocolate macarons and some almond financier teacakes (the recipes are all in Teatime in Paris).

teatime in paris with macarons financiers and pistachio tea

The only way to have a cup of tea, is by loving it.

I’ll drink to that, Monsieur Leleu.

Macaron tea Je t'aime by Theodor Paris Teatime

Cheers to you, my readers, with a cup of I love you tea. And cheers to discovering the unexpected, new views and senses, and revisiting daily Parisian routine.

THEODOR PARIS
28 Rue des Sablons
75016 Paris

Metro: Trocadéro

First Bac Sucré Event on Paris Pastry Street

For sweet fans who love to awake the taste-buds and discover memorable unique pleasures in pastry, confiserie and chocolate, rue du Bac is your address in Paris this week. Running until Sunday 21 June 2015, the Bac Sucré is the first ever annual event organised to celebrate the transformation of sugar by the famous artisans that have made this Paris pastry street become so special on the Rive Gauche.

Just before the official opening yesterday evening by the Mayor of the 7th Arrondissement, Rachida Dati, I made my way starting from the Rue du Bac metro, popping in to the first chocolate shops.

Rue du Bac Paris

First stop, Pierre Marcolini. This Belgian chocolate maker is one of the few chocolatiers in Paris who makes chocolate from bean to bar. Normally I love popping in to the shop in Rue de Seine on my St Germain chocolate walks but for this occasion, the welcome for Bac Sucré was with Monsieur Marcolini’s unique and healthy “Cocoa Infusion”, which has taken three years to master.

It was served refreshingly cold for the summer, inviting a new angle on cocoa drinks. Although labelled as “plain” (the other version is subtly perfumed with rose), this naturally delicate but stimulating infusion is a rich source of polyphenols and antioxidants that play a role in combating cell ageing (I’ll drink to that!). The addition of citrus slices and vanilla is a lovely touch yet in the background is still the hint of cocoa. The infusions can be taken warm in winter or in summer, infused in hot water and left to chill.

Pierre Marcolini Chocolate Paris

Don’t forget to taste Pierre Marcolini’s macarons, too; for the record, he also won the world pastry championships in Lyon in 1995.

Next visit, Chapon across the road at number 69. Patrice Chapon is another rare chocolate maker in Paris who takes the art of chocolate further by perfecting his chocolates directly from the source of the cacao bean.

Chapon chocolate maker Paris

I took notice of Patrice Chapon’s name ever since my first Paris Salon du Chocolat. Every October during the Salon, there’s always a queue in front of his famous Chocolate Mousse Bar. For amateurs of dark chocolate, how can you turn up a tasting of a spectacular 100% pure cacao Venezuela chocolate mousse? Or a Madagascar light and fruity mousse with a slight menthol taste; a Cuba mousse with a slightly smoky, underwood taste (hm – could I have that with a peaty Whisky, please?) or why not a rounder taste in the mouth of the light notes of apricot, dried fruits and caramel with the Perou?

Next time I pop in, I should pick one from the bar to take a mousse cone to go.  Or it could be this deliciously gooey chocolate cake? It’s called VSD: Vendredi Samedi Dimanche – with a name like that you know it’s going to be special. It was another real treat to have Patrice Chapon there himself to take us through the tastings for the event with his lovely team.

Chapon chocolate mousse

Tastings from the chocolate mousse bar or a gooey bite of VSD: Vendredi Samedi Dimanche cake

Patrice Chapon explained his method of selecting the beans from across the world; from the Ivory Coast, to Ghana, to Venezuela, to Peru, to Madagascar (there are many more) – to roasting until he’s left with the cocoa nibs (or grué – very edible at this point, even if bitter, ideal for savoury cooking, in my opinion) then the next stage is spent grinding it down in his conching machine.  This machine below is just a small version he uses on a daily basis but normally it’s on a bigger scale in Chelles, 20 km north-east of Paris – something I look forward to posting for you later.

Chapon Paris chocolate-making from bean to bar

Then there are the pralines, with the Agates popular with customers.  His latest are on the same lines but are Smileys, with a crunchy, powerful praline of almonds and hazelnuts enrobed in white chocolate.

Chocolate pralines at Chapon Paris

As a previous marketer, I appreciate packaging to show off and preserve the contents for high-end goods.  Patrice Chapon has something to smile about since not only are each of his chocolate bars given a pretty nostalgic theme, but the wrapper is re-sealable in able to preserve the chocolate as long as possible for dark chocolate-nibbling squirrels like myself.

Chapon chocolate bars

Roll on Saturday, when I’m bringing along Lucie to take part in one of his demonstrations during the day at the workshop behind the shop. (Call 01 42 22 95 98 to sign up for either 15h, 15h30, 16h, 16h30 or email).

Next is Dalloyau, just around the corner on 63 rue de Grenelle. For the event, the institution’s emblem reminds us that they’ve been around since 1682, as it’s firmly nestled into the religieuse heads of these pastries.  Don’t be fooled by their appearance.  These two are savoury! Not sure of the salmon being so yellow, but hey, I haven’t tasted it yet – for the next visit or tell me what it’s like if you get there first!

Dalloyau Paris Savoury Religieuse

Continuing on rue du Bac, just on the next corner to rue de Varenne, is the new boutique of Jacques Genin. Known for his signature caramels, chocolate and exquisite pastries at the Tea Salon in Rue de Turenne, Monsieur Genin was presenting his latest daring taste sensations to add to his fruit jelly range: he’s invented vegetable jellies!

Admittedly, I’d already tried them last week with my friend, Francis. Curious to taste, we tried cucumber, pepper, beetroot and turnip. The cucumber is wonderfully fresh for the summer and fun on the palate. The pepper and beetroots’ sweetness were unearthed too but somehow the originality of the turnip just didn’t do it for me.  As a Scot, I’m perhaps too stuck in my ways enjoying the humble turnip with my haggis and mash. For the rest of the tasting, you can possibly see that the green rhubarb jellies were suspiciously low on stock with me being around the stand…

Jacques Genin chocolate and pastry, Rue de Varenne Paris

Now, Monsieur Genin was definitely demonstrating how cheeky he can become when chocolate is concerned. No wonder he was posing like this for the camera when you taste his latest number!  Ladies and Gentlemen, meet his chocolate bars with capers. I love the size of the bars rather than small chocolates, as the saltiness of the capers don’t come through straight away.  There’s a crunchiness in the chocolate that makes it quite a sensation. I’m looking forward to posting more about Jacques Genin soon from his laboratory in the Marais.

Jacques-Genin chocolate caramel capers rue de Varenne Paris

After that wonderful capering around, on to more classic pastries at 108 rue du Bac.  Angelina have created a raspberry twist to their signature Mont Blanc dessert especially for the Bac Sucré event. Normally crème de marrons (chestnut vanilla cream) is rather sweet but that’s what makes these pastry houses so special: they are not too sweet at all with just the right balance. Yes, that’s something to smile about!

Angelina rue du bac Paris

The Godfather of the Bac Sucré event is Philippe Conticini, known for making the patisseries of dreams from La Pâtisserie des Rêves. This was his very first store at 93 rue du Bac. Now he continues to make clients dream of their sweetest childhood memories through his creations via his characteristic glass-belled boutiques around the world.

Patisserie des Reves, rue du Bac Paris

For the event, even the taste of his sweeties tasting of sweeties (bonbons tasting of bonbons) were childhood-provoking. A real privilege to meet chef Conticini himself, he was most sincere how he explained how the critic scene in the Disney film, Ratatouille, was a turning point for him and how meeting a group of Japanese tasting something so French and completely different to what they’d tasted before could evoke such déjà vu memories of something they’d thought they’d eaten before.  “It wasn’t possible!”, he confided.  That was the revelation: to realise he could aim to create that intrinsic pleasure of evoking delicious childhood. Sweet dreams, indeed.

Patisserie des Reves, Philippe Conticini Paris

I encourage you to head over to rue du Bac for the Bac Sucré event until Father’s Day afternoon on Sunday 21st in Paris.  There are so many other boutiques to visit yet – I’m aiming for Hugo & Victor, Foucher, La Grande Epicerie and Des Gâteaux et du Pain (Claire Damon is the genius behind the patisserie, seen below) and Eric Kayser over the weekend.

Bac Sucre event Paris June 2015

For the full programme, follow the link below. And if you can’t get there, that’s my job to transport you there via le blog. Thank you to the organisers of Le Bac Sucré and to the wonderful chefs for making this new event happen and for sharing their savoir-faire with us. Thank you, Carol of ParisBreakfasts for spotting this last week!  Loved making new friends too: Virginie, Charlène, Solli – see you soon!

Bac Sucre Event June 2015 rue du Bac Paris

Bac Sucré® Event
Rue du Bac
7th Arrondissement Paris

Tuesday 16- Sunday 21 June 2015
For the full programme, go to BacSucre.com 

—>Next Edition 2016: 15-19 June! 

 

Le Bac Sucré – 16-21 June, Rue du Bac Paris

For the very first time, Paris’s most famous gourmet street is holding a festival this week, entitled Le Bac Sucré. From Tuesday 16 to Sunday 21 June, the Rue du Bac will be demonstrating its glorious deliciousness to the public.

Situated on the left bank (Rive Gauche) south of the River Seine, the Rue du Bac is one of the sweetest streets of Paris, with an astonishing high concentration of high-end pâtisseries and chocolate boutiques. So it’s not surprising that it’s featured prominently in Teatime in Paris!

Rue du Bac Teatime in Paris

Naturally, the Mayor of the 7th arrondissement is proud to show off its area and share the savoir-faire of its talented bakers, pastry chefs, and chocolate makers.

Led by Philippe Conticini of the Pâtisserie des Rêves, six days will be centred around tastings, workshops and demonstrations open to the public, including animations for children.

Rue du Bac Paris Patisseries

Other stars of pastry and chocolate will be there, and I’m sincerely hoping to also get a glimpse of  Pierre Marcolini and Jacques Genin.

Participating artists include the famous houses of La Pâtisserie des Rêves, Angelina, Hugo & Victor, Des Gateaux et du Pain (Claire Damon), Eric Kayser, La Grande Epicerie de Paris, plus the historical house of Dalloyeau.

Download Le Bac Sucré programme here (in French).

For more information, visit www.bacsucre.com

I hope to see you there! Don’t forget to take along Dad next Sunday 21st June, for a tasty Father’s Day, or Fête des Peres!

French Clafoutis – Baked Cherry Custard Dessert

Clafoutis is a French speciality from the Limousin region. It’s also one of my French Mother-in-law’s specialities and so one of my husband’s favourite classic desserts. When we visit Antoine’s parents in Provence in the summer, Madeleine proudly rustles up her baked dark cherry custard dessert especially for son grand fils, her eldest son, with cherries freshly plucked from the orchard at the bottom of the garden.

But after twenty years, I finally plucked up the courage to make this ridiculously easy pudding at home. Why did I wait so long to make it? Perhaps, I dare say, because it was a bit heavy – especially as I prefer lighter desserts. Could Belle Maman really discover I’d slightly changed her recipe?

baked cherry custard dessert clafoutis

So many clafoutis recipes call for pitted cherries. Like it’s traditionally made in the Limousin, Madeleine normally throws in the whole cherries as they are and most of us politely dispose of the stones at the table. I say most of us, as Antoine – in his more natural Corsican style – rocks on the back of his chair, plotting his target as he catapults and projects them less than delicately into the garden – “Heh, je plante!”, he shrugs at us all.  It’s his Corsican sense of humour of saying he’s planting cherry trees. Oh, pl-ease!

I may mock but whole, unpitted cherries do keep in their flavour, and it’s far quicker than standing over the kitchen table with dark cherry-stained hands looking like Jack or Jill the Ripper. So just throw them in as they are naturally then get the family to do the gardening at the table. Otherwise pit them if you prefer, especially if you have a cherry stone extractor as part of your kitchen gadgetry.

This almond-topped clafoutis has been tried, tested and approved by Antoine, Julie and Lucie. Just don’t tell his Mum.

French clafoutis easy recipe

FRENCH CLAFOUTIS (Cherry Baked Custard) RECIPE

The almond topping idea is pinched from my friend, Véronique (merci!). You could replace the almond extract with a tablespoon of Kirsch or Amaretto liqueur for a more adult version.

SERVES 4-6
Preparation Time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: 35-40 minutes

INGREDIENTS

500g fresh black cherries, washed, not pitted

For the mould (china or earthenware dish):
10g butter
10g sugar

70g plain flour
good pinch of salt (fleur de sel)
1/2 tsp baking powder
3 medium eggs, organic
1 egg yolk
80g sugar
270g full-cream milk
25g butter, melted
few drops of almond extract (optional)
25g silvered almonds (optional, for garnish)

Pouring clafoutis batter on to cherries

1. Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F (gas 4). Butter an ovenproof china or pyrex dish (22cm diameter and 5cm deep) large enough to hold the cherries in a single layer.  Sprinkle in the sugar, shaking it all around so that it coats the surface of the dish and place the cherries in it.

2. Combine the flour, salt, baking powder and sugar in a large bowl.  Add the eggs and yolk and, using a balloon whisk, mix well until the mixture is smooth.  Continue whisking adding the milk, almond extract and melted butter. Pour over the cherries.

French clafoutis before baking

3. Bake for 35-40 minutes or until browned. Toast the flaked almonds in a non-stick frying pan for a few minutes on medium heat until they’re golden and sprinkle on the Clafoutis with a dusting of icing/confectioner’s sugar.

Serve warm directly from the dish.

clafoutis cherry baked custard dessert

Don’t forget to join me on Instagram (or Facebook), where I’m having fun posting shots from day to day around Paris – from the market, to chocolate and pastry walks, to views of Paris, to mad family life.

cherry French dessert clafoutis

Feeling daring? Why not try out these savoury asparagus clafoutis recipes as a summery supper dish?

White Asparagus Clafoutis
Asparagus, Mint & Pea Gluten-Free Clafoutis

Pascal Caffet in Paris

Don’t be fooled by McDonalds on the corner of Place de Passy in Paris’s 16th arrondissement. It perhaps marks the start of Rue Duban, where the Marché de Passy indoor market adds to the hustle and bustle with delivery vans and florists, but this street has more to it than at first glance.

Last month, as an occasional pilgrimage to stock up on some M&S British goodies for Antoine and the girls, I was  immediately drawn across the road by a most impressive Chocolatier and Pâtissier.

Rue Duban Paris 16

It was the signature of Pascal Caffet en plus that lured me right in. The name rang a curious bell. Nearly 12 years ago, Lucie’s christening cake was personally delivered to Paris by Antoine’s uncle, Tonton Claude, who lives near Troyes. I remember how proud he was, showing off his local pâtisserie’s talents by one of France’s most prized pastry chefs, Pascal Caffet, who now has 3 boutiques in Troyes alone.  Since then he has opened yet another 2 boutiques in the Champagne region, two in Burgundy, plus in Italy and Japan. Thankfully for us there are now two in Paris.

Pascal Caffet Patisserie Paris

Entering the boutique, it was everything I love in a top pâtisserie and chocolate shop: not just the products and knowledge about them, but also the warm welcome. The owner, Charles Benchetrit, couldn’t be a more friendly and passionate ambassador of Pascal Caffet’s creations.

Last week, returning to buy more, I was in for a huge surprise.  Smartly casual wearing a cheeky smile, Pascal was there himself – totally modest for such a prizewinner, most notably for being the youngest ever Meilleur Ouvrier de France (aka MOF, the highly coveted Olympian of French craftsmen in France) in pâtisserie at age 27 in 1989, and in 1995 as world champion of pastry-chocolate-ice cream in Milan.

Pascal Caffet, Meilleur Ouvrier de France Pâtisserie Paris

What better excuse is that for us customers to taste? Previously I’d particularly loved the Paris-Troyes (top left), based on the classic praline-filled round choux, the Paris-Brest. This is his take on it using an almond praline cream, a light Madagascan vanilla cream and dribbled with a 66% dark chocolate. The ultimate pastry to try is his Las Vegas (bottom left), which earned him the title of MOF with chocolate biscuit, dark chocolate mousse (Venezuela 70%), Madagascan vanilla crème diplomate, crispy almond and raspberries. You can see why.

Las Vegas and Paris Troyes pastries

This time I was treated to a small tasting in the shop with the Exotique (above), with a soft exotic fruit mousse, wild strawberries and sponge. My favourite part was the crunch of the pineapple in syrup at the end…

Pascal Caffet, winning pastry chef and chocolate maker in Paris and Troyes

Did I mention that Pascal is also extremely down to earth and fun, too? I want to frame this shot of him sneaking in at the last second. For all his prestigious line-up of awards, it hasn’t gone to his head!

Macarons in pastry shop window in Paris

He’s also mad about macarons: with 20 different flavours to choose from, they’re all made with the most delicate chocolate ganaches, making them how we love them: ever-so-slightly meringue crispy on the outside and beautifully soft in the inside. Charles let me taste Chocolat passion, Vanille framboise, caramel à la fleur de sel. What is it with salted caramel?  I have to say this one was my personal favourite.

Macaron tasting Paris

Chocolates are another passion: this pure origine Brésil was striking for a 100% cacao ganache in that it wasn’t bitter, just a pure chocolate sensation with a long aftertaste. Oh, and it’s made with Criollo, one of the rare cacao varieties which makes up only about 5% of global production, so it’s the Grand Cru Classé of chocolate. If you love pralines, this is the place to come!

Pascal Caffet chocolate Paris

At first I thought these round nutty chocolate disks were mendiants. They are instead given the tongue-in-cheek name, Croqs’Télé, as they’re perfect for munching in front of the TV (ahem – we don’t munch in front of the telly, do we?).  Filled with praline, they’re topped with caramelised almonds and hazelnuts from Piemonte.

Mendiants, or the praline version by MOF Pascal Caffet

These raspberry caramels hit the spot and would do for Lucie, too, as she has a brace: they’re deliciously clever non-stick caramels on the teeth. Dare I say, she would also appreciate the pots of salted caramel and recognise the huge difference between Nutella and his range of artisanal chocolate-hazelnut spreads (pâte à tartiner) or Chocopraliné, as he calls it.

French caramels

The family have done his éclairs proud.  After tasting so many of them, you could say we’re experts of les éclairs au Caffet! Intense coffee, passion fruit, pistachio, Paris-Brest, hazelnut praline, Chocotartiné®, acidic lemon and salted caramel.  Not bad, eh? Oh, and the Fraise Gourmande is missing since we tasted it in the shop. Gourmande and strawberry it certainly was.

French eclairs

I wonder if we get a tasting medal?  Well, no – we still have many more treats to try out – but in true French style, avec modération… I thoroughly recommend you help me out and taste them for yourself.

Pascal Caffet and Charles at the Paris patisserie in rue Duban

Pascal and Charles – you rock! Thanks for coming to Paris.

Pascal Caffet
13 rue Duban75016 Paris

Tel: 01 – 45 20 08 04
Metro: La Muette


 

Disclaimer: This is not a sponsored post. I was not asked to write anything about the store and all comments are entirely my own.

Teatime in Paris Online Book Tour

What a fantastic week this has been with the Paris sunshine. The cherry on the cake is that Teatime in Paris has been lucky enough to continue its online book tour to Toronto and Vancouver in Canada this week!  It has then enjoyed being eaten in the USA, then flown over to Cornwall, England and returned to France, popping in to one of the cutest villages, near Le Touquet.  Although it would be wonderful being whisked on a magic carpet and sent to these places in person, I’m so happy that Teatime has continued its launch limelight, being featured by such wonderful writers.

Salted Caramel Macarons from Teatime in Paris

If anyone follows le blog and also on social media, you’ll notice just how many teatime treats I’ve enjoyed together in Paris over the years with my good friend, Mardi Michels.

Mardi writes and cooks for EatLiveTravelWrite and also spends her spare time cooking up a storm with the petits chefs at school, teaching macaron classes in Toronto and regularly comes to Paris, keeping up-to-date with the latest gastronomic addresses. So it was an honour that she picked the salted caramel macarons to try. To see the recipe for the salted caramel filling and her review, please say bonjour from me over at EatLiveTravelWrite. If you’re in Canada or the USA, then enter the Giveaway for your chance to win a copy!

passion-lemon-meringue-tart

Heading west in Canada, Teatime ended up in one of my favourite cities, Vancouver.  I was thrilled the book made it just in time to conclude Teresa McCarthy’s Spring Book Reviews on her blog, OneWetFoot. She chose to make a family favourite of ours, passion and lemon meringue tarts – and if I understand, this recipe has now become her family favourite, too.  Please step over to enter the giveaway plus see the recipe and Teresa’s review at OneWetFoot.

In the USA, Teatime has been indexed by Eat Your Books! I was lucky to be interviewed by Jane about how the book came about and what discoveries were made along the way.  Please take a look. While reading the interview, don’t forget to enter the Giveaway for your chance to win a copy and discover the online cookbook world there.

Do you love sweet surprises? Just a few days ago, as I popped in for my favourite fun fix on Instagram, I was bowled over to see that Cherita, on the other side of the world, had already started baking from the book – and has also chosen to star these passion-lemon tarts for her parents’ anniversary. It’s so exciting when people don’t just read the book but try out the recipes too!

passion fruit and lemon meringue tartlet

In the UK, it has been such a pleasure to see teatime featured by Choclette, who writes for Tin and Thyme. Normally, as her name implies, Choclette features the most chocolatey of treats and was going to feature the double chocolate tartlets.  As they were previously featured by French Village Diaries and FarmersGirlKitchen, she chose to make the Diamond Biscuits to go with her tea. I love that she added her own twist to them by replacing half of the flour with wholemeal spelt flour. To see the diamants recipe and her review, pop over to Choclette’s Tin and Thyme and say hi from me!

Diamond biscuits from Teatime in Paris

Back in France, teatime is featured by Janine Marsh who writes for The Good Life France.  I was so happy to have Janine join us for the launch event in Paris then review the book with her readers. Don’t forget to enter the international giveaway and hear what she has to say about Teatime.

If you have a copy of Teatime in Paris, please do join in the recipe fun and show us your creations by tagging me @madaboutmacarons and using the hashtag #TeatimeInParis. I’d love to see what recipe you make and I’ll look forward to sharing them.

A huge, heartfelt thank you for featuring the book on your websites and on social media.  Wishing you all a lovely week. Next up, I’m sharing a taste of a fabulous pâtisserie in Paris, with one of France’s most prized pastry chefs!

Hugs from a very sunny Paris

Jillx