Curried Cauliflower Soup with Seared Scallops – and a Flooded Seine

This weekend, as we’re waiting for the flooded Seine to rise to its peak in Paris and upstream today or tomorrow, we’re also keeping spirits high – both here and in Burgundy.  First with the Fête de Coquille de Saint Jacques (Scallop Festival) high on the hill in Montmartre and the 74th Fête de Saint-Vincent Tournante wine festival in Burgundy. As I’m not able to go to either of them, I’ve instead made a comprise of the two in a dish: Curried Cauliflower Soup with Seared Scallops.

Paris January 2018 Seine Floods

The Seine Floods January 2018

France’s meteorological service has confirmed that this is now the third-wettest last couple of months on record since data collection began in 1900.  Luckily, it looks very unlikely that we’ll reach the record flooding of 1910, when the river Seine rose to a whopping 8.62 metres.  Even although we live near the Seine next to Saint-Germain-en-Laye, west of Paris, in 1910 the flooding came as far as the bottom of our garden!

The tourist river cruises and all other boat traffic on the Seine in Paris and upstream has been stopped. It’s not difficult to see why by these photos I took on Thursday afternoon.  Already it was approaching close to 6 metres, more than four metres above its normal height. But apart from some RER and metro lines closed, the City of Light is in good hands and the skies are holding off on the forecasted rain – for the moment!

curried cauliflower soup seared scallops

Annual Burgundy Wine Festival Inspiration

This year’s Burgundy wine festival, la fête de Saint Vincent Tournante, is taking place in Prissé, Macon.  I’ve been thrilled to take part in previous festivals – and even interviewed on French radio! Join me in the typical ambience by reading these posts on Clos Vougeot, 2015 and Saint Aubin in 2014: the chosen village gears up to the event by decorating trees, houses, wine casks and the likes with coloured crèpe paper flowers (representing the wine qualities – white flowers or fleurs blanches) and interesting sculptures. As we’re given the list of local wine producers taking part with their special festival blends, we flit between tastings trying to keep warm with stands offering simple dishes that compliment the wines.

In 2014, I distinctly remember a welcoming bowl of curried cauliflower soup with seared scallops.  The French are not known as being soup lovers but this chef was popular that day, as he served out this comforting, healthy soup – with the crème de la crème of seared, almost sweet, scallops fried in front of us and left to sink into the soup as we were holding our glasses of Saint Aubin white wine balanced on a string around our necks.

curried cauliflower soup with seared scallops

Ever since that delicious moment, I have been making this at home as it’s so easy to reproduce.  When it comes to curry, the French never serve it hot and spicy: instead it’s usually only lightly fragranced with curry powder – perfect so as not to overpower the scallops, as we’re left to appreciate their nutty flavours in browned butter and hint of turmeric. I’ve recently discovered a Scottish Hebridean smoked salt from the Isle of Lewis which, topped to finish, is a most subtle compliment to finish it all off – and, if you have my book, Mad About Macarons, it’s brilliant served with a mini curry Tikka Macsala macaron!  The spicy curry’s fire is put out by the balancing sweetness of the macaron shells.

Curried Cauliflower Soup with Seared Scallops

 

curried cauliflower soup with seared scallops

seared scallops in turmeric and smoked salt

 

curried cauliflower soup with seared scallops
Print
Curried Cauliflower Soup with Seared Scallops
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
30 mins
Total Time
45 mins
 

A lightly curried cauliflower soup given the French touch with sweet, seared fresh scallops in turmeric and Scottish smoked salt.

Course: Main, Soup, Starter
Cuisine: French, Scottish
Servings: 6
Calories: 139 kcal
Author: Jill Colonna
Ingredients
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large onion finely chopped
  • 1 large cauliflower weighing about 1kg/2lb, leaves & core removed, cut into florets
  • 1 tbsp curry powder (or ground cumin)
  • ground pepper
  • 2 tsp salt fleur de sel
  • 900 ml /30fl oz chicken/veg stock
  • 6 fresh scallops
  • 20 g /0.75oz butter unsalted
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp smoked salt optional
  • fresh coriander leaves & dried onions for garnish and curry macarons!
Instructions
  1. Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy based pan and add the onion. Cook gently for 5 minutes without browning. Add the cauliflower florets and curry powder and sauté in the oil for another 5 minutes until the curry coats the florets. Add the pepper, salt and stock (the stock should be at the same level as the cauliflower, just enough to cover).
  2. Bring to the boil, then cover and simmer for about 20 minutes until the vegetables are soft.
  3. Blend until smooth.
  4. Melt the butter in a frying pan over medium-high heat and once foaming, add the turmeric and scallops. Sear them for about one minute on each side (depending on their thickness – please don’t overcook as they’ll turn rubbery). Top with a pinch of smoked salt, if using. You may want to cut the scallops in half.
  5. Pour the soup into bowls, add a scallop each to sink into the soup and serve with crispy onions, fresh coriander and a mini curry macaron (optional! Recipe in my 1st book, Mad About Macarons)

Recipe Notes

Food & Wine Pairing:

What wine to accompany this curried cauliflower soup with seared scallops? A chilled glass of white Burgundy or a Chenin Blanc.

Jill Colonna

MadAboutMacarons.com

 

Cheers! Santé !

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Another Year and Even More Mad About Macarons!

Happy New Year!  Wishing you the best of health, happiness and may all your sweet dreams come true in 2018.
To kick off the year, here’s a batch of dark chocolate macarons made with a splash of Whisky Liqueur (Drambuie) just to have an excuse to say Cheers to you! Santé ! Sláinte!

chocolate whisky macarons

It’s easy to reproduce them yourself at home. Grab a copy of my book, Teatime in Paris, then simply flick to the Macaron Recipe chapter and follow the instructions for the Chocolate, Honey & Orange Blossom Macarons. Just replace the orange blossom with a Whisky Liqueur (I used Drambuie, which has a herbal honey flavour to it) or your favourite Whisky for a wee kick.

Are you a keen baker, love macarons but haven’t yet made them? Then make 2018 your year of le macaron!

The Auld Alliance: France & Scotland

As some of you may have seen on Instagram/Facebook, I’ve been looking for many ways to celebrate since in December, I became a French citizen.  Do I feel different? Well, yes. Bah ouiii! I should have done this years ago but now I’m finally able to vote full-monty-on in France; like many of my fellow ex-pats, it’s something I wasn’t able to do as a British citizen abroad during the UK Brexit elections. So now I have more of an identity, including an official French Carte d’Identité and been so emotional, that I’ve had quite a frog in my throat. As I’ve kept my British-Scottish nationality, it’s leading me to post more French and Scottish recipes here – it’s surprising how much they have in common.  Although I’m called Mad About Macarons, don’t be put off – I post all kinds of different recipes here, including the ‘sweeter’ recipes reduced in sugar.

cannele cakes from Bordeaux

Look, I’m not as ‘tweet’ as you think…

The Scots particularly loved their Bordeaux wines, known as Claret or Clairet, as the much-awaited barrels arrived in Edinburgh’s Leith Docks.  But Bordeaux is also just as famous for their Canelé teacakes, found in many Parisian bakeries. Made with egg yolks (the whites were used for the wine), vanilla and rum, you’ll also find an easy recipe for them in Teatime in Paris.

Edinburgh’s Christmas

Before I post the first recipes and blog articles for 2018, here are just a few snapshots while spending Christmas with my family in Scotland.  We were lucky to arrive on Christmas Eve and enjoy the ambience of Edinburgh’s award-winning Christmas Market.

edinburgh Christmas Market Scotland

The Christmas Market flows over not just one but THREE levels in East Princes Street Gardens, around the Scot Monument. Stalls of fragrant festive spices in all shapes and forms greet passers-by, along with tartan reindeer and other beautiful crafts, plus ample opportunities to stop for a mug of mulled wine or cider in between rides for all ages.

Edinburgh Christmas Market

If you haven’t been to ‘Edinburgh’s Christmas‘, then mark it on your bucket list: it includes shows, free events, Santa’s Grotto, ice sculptures – just to name a few. Following on to George Street after ice-skating in St Andrew’s Square, this dazzling construction below – again encasing more opportunities for a Christmas tipple from a Whisky Liqueur to RumChata Hot Chocolate – lures the more adventurous to the Drop Tower next door.

Last year my daughter, Lucie, was so excited to be whirled around high above the Scot Monument on the Star Flyer but this year the even more daunting tower certainly made our jaws drop – and that was just looking on!

Edinburgh's Christmas

As we looked on in disbelief at her few minutes of screaming and waving her legs about towering over Edinburgh, cocktails beckoned in one of the many chic establishments in George Street before heading back home to continue the festive fun with the rest of the family.

The following days involved plenty of flambéd Christmas Puddings with brandy butter and custard from talented dessert whizzes Auntie Catherine, and my adorable sis-in-law – who laid on extra entertainment of chasing chickens off the road back into the neighbours’ garden in Kinross.

Christmas Cocktails

Epiphany in France – A Feast of the Kings

Now that we’re back in France, the festivities continue with Epiphany, the Feast of the Kings or Twelfth Night this weekend (what January diet? I never diet!)  Traditionally, this puff pastry almond-frangipane-filled dessert contains a lucky favour (fève), and the person who gets it becomes King or Queen for the day.  Perhaps that’s why we don’t just celebrate it this weekend only: like most of the French do, we’ll no doubt be continuing with this cutting, tasting and crowning until the end of January!  There are so many different creative versions to try out.

For more explanation on the Galette des Rois and a line-up from many top pastry chefs in Paris, see my post here. Although written two years ago, many of the galettes remain the same in the Parisian bakery windows – including my own homemade recipe. You knew it was coming … the recipe is in Teatime in Paris!

galette des Rois for Epiphany

 

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Comments

Please also don’t be shy about leaving a comment below any posts here. Your email is never shared publicly. I’m so thrilled to hear from you, whether it’s just a hello, a question, or telling me you’ve made the recipe (that’s always the BEST!). Your motivating comments make this blog worth continuing this year as I don’t monetise my blog.  Until the next, à très bientôt !