Raspberry Vegan Macarons: Aquafaba French Meringue

Some friends of mine have been trying the Veganuary challenge but I’m not as brave to go the whole way. See? It has taken me until the last day of January to even post these Raspberry Vegan Macarons!

Vegan macarons

Flexitarian is my name: I rarely eat red meat, stick to poultry and fish as much as possible – in between at least a few vegetarian weekly meals. To be a vegan means carrying on eating a deliciously crispy French baguette but cutting out all that gorgeous unpasteurised French cheese, butter, milk and organic eggs etc.

I’m simply not ready to give them up yet even although I know I want to make the change eventually.  However, I do enjoy my healthy maple oat granola or spiced granola in the mornings with almond milk and, for vegan party food, make these energy bites in the form of dried fruit spicy snowballs and salted toffee cherry tomatoes, great with a glass of rosé. That’s it, really – for now.

So why am I making these Raspberry Vegan Macarons so late in the day? I love a challenge and besides, I want to see if I can make them using aquafaba.

Raspberry Vegan Macarons with Aquafaba French Meringue

Aquafaba – it is miraculous to watch how this fancy name for the brine of tinned chickpeas or beans can go from a simple thick brown reduced liquid to a whipped up, shiny, regular-looking meringue. It looks like it’s made from egg whites but it’s easy to be fooled in the looks department: it’s entirely vegan with no eggs used!

As with my regular macaron recipes in my books using egg whites, I use the French meringue method – so no candy thermometers are needed. It’s a lot easier, producing just as good results.

raspberry vegan macarons

French meringue using Aquafaba, the brine from canned chickpeas

All was going well, just as I would be making regular gluten-free French meringue macarons by my books. Once I’d completed the macaronnage (basically the mixing of the batter to eliminate air bubbles and produce a shiny texture) it looked ready to pipe out the shells, even if a bit thicker than I’m used to.

Piping out the mixture, the batter was indeed thicker and a bit grainier than for my regular macarons and, therefore, susceptible to having pointy tops (I shall refrain here from what I normally call them!). Apart from that, no problem.

raspberry vegan macarons - method

Airing Vegan Macarons

As for regular macarons, leave them to sit out and air for at least 30 minutes. Even using aquafaba for vegan macarons, the effect is the same: the outer layer becomes quite hard to the touch. Once this happens, they’re ready to bake.

Raspberry vegan macarons

Oven Temperature for Vegan Macarons

I knew that Aquafaba doesn’t like high temperatures and for making aquafaba meringue, it prefers lower temperatures much like for normal meringues. So, I reduced the oven slightly from my usual macaron temperature to 140°C fan just to try out the first batch.

Oh-oh. A totally maca-wrong move.

raspberry vegan macarons first attempt

Rasbperry Vegan Macarons – Learning that oven temp is NOT the same as for making regular macarons!

Clearly that first batch wasn’t right!  The temperature was still FAR TOO HIGH.  As with making regular macarons, I bake the trays one at a time; just as well, as at least I didn’t ruin the rest of the batter! I could easily correct it by reducing the oven temperature to 110°C fan (130°C) for the next batch.

Bingo!  It worked.  For the vegan filling, I personally find it’s not that easy to find tasty vegan ideas to sandwich the shells together, as I can’t use the normal chocolate ganaches or buttercreams. I would need a lot of time to work on this part! The easiest to hand was homemade raspberry jam – or try it with this rhubarb, hibiscus & rose jam. Another easy alternative is classic peanut butter but that would look strange with pink. When ready to eat next day, I sprinkled them with some freeze-dried raspberry powder for that extra raspberry flavour.

raspberry vegan macarons

Vegan Macarons Recipe

5 from 1 vote
Vegan macarons
Raspberry Vegan Macarons
Prep Time
30 mins
Cook Time
15 mins
Resting time in cool oven
15 mins
Total Time
45 mins
 

Picture perfect raspberry vegan macarons, made with Aquafaba (brine from tinned chickpeas) French meringue and filled with lemon verbena infused raspberry jam.

Course: Dessert, teatime
Cuisine: French
Keyword: aquafaba macarons, raspberry vegan macarons, vegan desserts, Vegan macarons
Servings: 18 macarons
Calories: 115 kcal
Author: Jill Colonna
Ingredients
  • 100 g (3.5oz) Aquafaba, chickpea brine (reduced from a 400g tin)
  • 75 g (3oz) caster sugar
  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar
  • 150 g (5.5oz) finely ground almonds (almond flour)
  • 150 g (5.5oz) icing/confectioner's sugar
  • pinch powdered pink colouring or beetroot colouring (optional)
Instructions
  1. Drain the brine/liquid from a 400g tin of chickpeas into a saucepan. Reduce the liquid (uncovered) on low-medium heat for about 10 minutes until reduced to about 2/3. Leave to cool then refrigerate overnight.

  2. Using a stand mixer (or with electric hand beaters), whisk the aquafaba and cream of tartare in a large bowl, adding the caster sugar gradually once it starts to foam. Continue to whisk, gradually on high speed for 10 minutes or until the aquafaba starts to form firm, glossy peaks. If using, add a good pinch of pink powdered food colouring.

  3. Sift the ground almonds and icing sugar into a large bowl, putting aside any leftover bits of almonds for decorating desserts later. Add the whipped aquafaba and, using a good flexible spatula, mix the ingredients together until combined. Beat out any air using  pastry scraper, continuing back and forward until the batter is glossy and falls off the scraper. Transfer the batter to a piping bag with a plain tip (8mm).

  4. Line 2 flat baking trays with baking parchment (I prefer this to a silicone mat, as it's easier to produce feet). Pipe out small rounds, leaving enough space between each (they will spread in the oven slightly) .

  5. Leave the trays out to air for about 30 minutes until they are quite hard to the touch. If still too soft, leave out for longer. Preheat the oven to 130°C/110°C fan/250°F/Gas 1/2.

  6. Bake each tray separately for 15 minutes. Turn the oven off and leave the tray in the oven with the door open for a further 15 minutes (this sounds cumbersome but after experimenting was the best way for this recipe). Leave to cool.

  7. For the filling: Arrange the macaron shells into pairs and marry each couple together by piping out one half with raspberry jam, top with the other shell then set aside in the fridge for 24 hours. (I heated up a quarter of a jar of raspberry jam with a few lemon verbena leaves and left the jam to cool).

Recipe Notes

Add the leftover chickpeas to this Moroccan-style spicy Chicken & Prune Tagine, for example.

For regular macaron recipes using egg whites, see the recipes in both my books, Mad About Macarons and Teatime in Paris.

 

Jill Colonna

MadAboutMacarons.com

Vegan macarons

Troubleshooting Vegan Macarons

  • Like regular Parisian macarons, ensure you weigh your ingredients by the gram or ounce using a digital scale (see reasons why in my article here) and follow the recipe to the letter.  Although not difficult to make, following the recipe through exactly will achieve the right result, although the only other culprits could be your ingredients and oven, as all ovens behave differently. For this, I’d suggest an oven thermometer, just to ensure your oven is doing what it says it’s doing;
  • As with regular Parisian macarons, avoid using liquid colouring as it waters down the meringue, making it difficult to work with.  I use powdered colouring where only a quarter teaspoon, for example, is needed. For stockists, see baking chat for more information;
  • Like regular Parisian macarons, bake each tray one at a time.  It’s more time consuming – and even more so for vegan macarons – but worth it as home kitchen ovens normally just don’t like dealing with it. Leaving the vegan macarons in the oven with the door open for 15 minutes at the end of baking proved to work so much better;
  • When baking vegan macarons, it’s totally different to baking regular Parisian macarons: the vegan aquafaba meringue prefers a lower oven temperature and baked (much like meringues) for longer.
raspberry vegan macarons

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Vegan Macarons – My Conclusion

At first glance, we could be convinced that they look like regular macarons using egg whites. They’re not quite as picture perfect compared to my classic Parisian macarons. I’m happy they had feet and no hollows, even if they were slightly sticky – there’s still room for improvement. To be honest, the most important element in French patisserie is taste before looks and so I need to work on that part first before really working on the perfectly smooth appearance.

Their taste, however, is nothing like regular macaron shells – no matter how much you hear, “Don’t worry; it will taste better in the end”. I added vanilla powder and some natural raspberry powder, just to help it along the way for flavour points. The eventual taste of the shells is strange, especially with raspberry: definitely sweet but there is the “weird” sensation with the aftertaste of, well, chick peas.

Although it’s comforting to know we can produce macaron-looking treats for vegans, I’m sticking to my own traditional French-meringue macarons using egg whites – at least until I can work on perfecting the same kind of taste we’re used to from all these wonderful Parisian patisseries.

For my classic Parisian macaron recipes, you’ll find most of them in Mad About Macarons! , along with detailed step-by-step instructions and in the chapter devoted to macarons in my latest book, Teatime in Paris.

Vegan macarons recipe Aquafaba

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Chicken Prune Tagine – Spicy Comfort Food

A Tagine is, broadly speaking, the French’s answer to the British’s favourite curry. When looking for a bit of comforting spice and the warming exotic, as the British go Indian, the French go Moroccan. As we’re a British-French family we love both – but during the winter, one of our favourite slow-cooked casseroles is this Chicken Prune Tagine, as it’s lighter than it looks.

chicken prune tagine

When I first arrived in Paris in 1992, Indian curry houses were rare; on the other hand, Moroccan Couscous restaurants were – and still are – extremely popular. What I love about tagines (or tajines, named after the dish they’re traditionally cooked in) is that they’re healthy, too. No need for a heavy dessert afterwards, either. The best dessert following this? Sliced juicy table oranges, with a hint of orange blossom water and more grilled almonds, if you have any left – and what about a orange and prune macaron?

This has been my go-to splashed and tattered recipe for years, adapted from a magazine cut-out (with my added notes like ‘More garlic!’, ‘add saffron’ and ‘fresh coriander a must’). Even French/Spanish family that live in Morocco approved this recipe, which is the ultimate compliment. Ideally it’s cooked in a tagine dish but is just as good in a good, heavy crock pot.

turkey prune tagine

This recipe started out as a lamb tagine but gradually, as the family have been eating meat less and enjoying more poultry, we’ve replaced it with something a bit more ‘meaty’ than chicken – even although chicken is super for this recipe. Traditionally, chicken tagine is usually made with olives and citron confit or preserved lemon (I love that too – recipe to come!). As it can be a bit acidic, the kids prefer this moreish chicken prune tagine version.

Meaty Poultry: Oyster (fowl) – Perfect for Chicken Prune Tagine

So what’s the special poultry meat that can fool us into thinking that it looks like lamb yet tastes slightly lighter? We find it at many local boucheries or at the local market: known as Sot l’y laisse or huîtres de poulet. They are Oyster Fowl – two oyster-sized rounds of darker poultry meat, found near the thighs.

sot l'y laisse or oyster fowl

They’re rather large – so large that, by rule of thumb, we usually have 3 per person and they can be each cut into 3.  They resemble pig’s cheeks (joues de porc), another interesting ingredient for spicy dishes. Please remind me later if you’re interested, as I have another recipe I often make yet haven’t posted. It’s dynamite.

What do they have in common? They’re so much cheaper and just as tender as lamb in a slow-cooked casserole.

Turkey prune tagine

Serve this Chicken Prune Tagine with medium sized semolina (couscous). According to packet instructions for semolina, use about 100g (3.5oz) per person with the same amount of water. Instead, for 4 portions, I’ll use 400g (14oz) of semolina, tossed in a tablespoon of olive oil, salt, pepper and 400ml of liquid: water topped with a tablespoon of Moroccan orange blossom water and mixed with a handful of golden sultanas, then heat.

Did you spot the macaron? It’s one of my savoury macarons from Mad About Macarons which uses mainly cumin and is ideal for serving before or during a fun spicy evening. It’s a taste sensation that tickles the senses: pop in a mini mac and hit the cayenne spice then the second that follows, the (reduced) sugar in the macaron shells put out the fire. Taste it and see!

turkey prune tagine macarons

Chicken Prune Tagine Recipe

Chicken Prune Tagine
Prep Time
20 mins
Cook Time
1 hr 40 mins
Total Time
2 hrs
 

A lightly spiced chicken tagine with prunes, served with orange blossom and sultana semolina and topped with toasted almonds and fresh coriander - perfect winter comfort food. Savoury macarons optional!

Course: Main, Main Course
Cuisine: French, Moroccan
Keyword: chicken prune tagine, couscous, spicy poultry slowcooked dish, tagine
Servings: 6 people
Calories: 473 kcal
Author: Jill Colonna
Ingredients
  • 1.2 kg (2lb 12oz) chicken breasts or whole chicken cut into 12 pieces (or oyster fowl)
  • 5 tbsp plain flour (for coating the chicken)
  • olive oil
  • 5 cloves garlic peeled & grated
  • 4 cm piece fresh ginger grated
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper (or more if you like it hot!)
  • 2 tbsp ground cumin
  • 1 tbsp 4-spices powder (cloves, cinnamon, ginger, pepper)
  • 1 tbsp ground coriander
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 600 ml (1 pint) chicken stock
  • sprig fresh thyme
  • 3 tomatoes chopped
  • 24 juicy prunes (ideally with stones for flavour)
  • Pinch saffron ground or strands (optional)
  • 25 g (1oz) almond slivers toasted under grill, for garnish
  • fresh coriander for garnish
Instructions
  1. Coat the chicken in flour and fry in olive oil in a large non-stick casserole dish. When browned on all sides, strain and remove from the pot. Keep aside on a plate. Add the grated garlic, ginger and cayenne, frying for a minute. Add the rest of the spices and fry for a further minute.

  2. Add the chicken back to the pot with the chicken stock and thyme Cover and cook on low heat for at least an hour. 

  3. Add the tomatoes, prunes and saffron, if using. Cook for a further 30 minutes. Prepare the semolina, as per packet instructions and serve with toasted almond slivers and lots of fresh coriander.

Recipe Notes

Serve with semolina (100g per person/100ml water including a tbsp orange blossom water, a tbsp olive oil for 6, pepper, salt, olive oil), prepare as of packet instructions and add a knob of butter when reheating.

The tagine can be made the day before and reheated before serving. Also freezes well. I suggest making the first part without the prunes. Cool, chill & freeze then after defrosting, reheat adding the prunes and continue the rest of the recipe.

Serve with a Moroccan red wine (we love 'Tandem', a syrah fruity/peppery red made as a joint effort by Alain Graillot and Ouled Thaleb winery near Casablanca).

 

Jill Colonna

MadAboutMacarons.com

 

chicken-prune-tagine-couscous

Thanks so much for sharing, pinning or commenting below – it means the world to hear that you’ve either made/enjoyed this Chicken Prune Tagine or even popped in just to say bonjour.

I forgot to tell you one of our other favourite winter warming slow-cooked casseroles: it’s this classic French Blanquette de Veau.

turkey prune tagine

Cumin and have a spicy winter warmer with a wee savoury macaron!

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Cranachan Parfait – An Iced Scottish Dessert

Cranachan is the name of a classic Scottish dessert. It’s so easy to put together and is made with simple ingredients: cream, honey, oatmeal and Whisky and layered with fresh Scottish raspberries. Here I’ve revisited the Scottish dessert with a French twist by turning it into a Cranachan Parfait.

Cranachan parfait

The Cranachan parfaits are soft honeycomb ice creams (no-churn) with a touch of Malt Whisky, topped with an oat praline crumble and served on a disk of Scottish shortbread then topped with raspberries.

The Scottish Cranachan dessert was originally served to celebrate the summer harvest festival. No matter how much people say their raspberries are better, there’s nothing to beat fresh Scottish berries! Even the best French ones don’t match up to them, in my humble opinion.

Cranachan parfait

However, when it comes to the major Scottish celebration dinners such as Burn’s Night on 25th January and Saint Andrew’s Night on 30th November, we’re always short for fresh, seasonal raspberries.

Luckily at our local Farmers’ market yesterday, I found some delicious raspberries – from Morocco! Surprisingly, they were full of flavour but as I prefer to buy local and seasonal, the berries are just for show here. Without fresh berries, thinly spread some good quality raspberry jam on the shortbread rounds before placing the Cranachan parfaits on top.

Cranachan parfait recipe method

Cranachan Parfait: Developing the Recipe

For the parfaits, I took inspiration from chef, Anne-Sophie Pic, who makes a vanilla parfait by making a hot syrup and pouring it directly onto egg yolks and whisks until frothy. She then adds whipped cream and turns it into spherical moulds. Here, I replaced the syrup with runny floral honey (ideally in Scotland, use heather honey) and since I was adding Whisky to the cream, doubled the portion of egg yolks in order for it to solidify more in the freezer, even although they will still be beautifully soft.

If you prefer a stronger-in-alcohol Scottish dessert, then try this non-churn Drambuie ice cream, delicious with chocolate ginger fondant cake!

Although made the night before, the parfaits can keep in the freezer for up to 10 days, so it’s parfait to prepare this dessert in advance.

cranachan-parfait-recipe

Making oat praline and shortbread rounds

I’ll post a separate recipe for Shortbread later – as my Granny’s Black Book of recipes contains several! Here I’ve used one of my favourites which uses more butter and, once the Shortbread is still warm and soft out of the oven, just cut out disks the same size of moulds.

No moulds? No worries. This Cranachan Parfait recipe doesn’t have to be made using moulds. Make it easier by placing the cream into a cake tin lined with parchment paper and freeze as a whole block, cutting off slices when ready to serve.

oat praline cranachan parfait

Oat Praline Crunchy Topping

Instead of oatmeal for the traditional dessert, soaked in Whisky overnight, I’ve made a simple praline with porridge oats to add some crunch for the texture. If you love crunchy praline on desserts, try this nutty nougatine recipe.

Want to go the Full Monty? Serve with Cranachan Macarons, the recipe of which is in my first book, Mad About Macarons.

Cranachan parfait Scottish dessert

Cranachan Parfait

Cranachan Parfait
Prep Time
40 mins
Cook Time
30 mins
Freezing time
2 hrs
Total Time
1 hr 10 mins
 

Cranachan Parfait, a French twist to the traditional Scottish dessert of cream, honey, Whisky, oats, served with raspberries, buttery shortbread and topped with a crunchy oat praline.

Course: Dessert, teatime
Cuisine: French, Scottish
Keyword: cranachan, honeycomb ice cream, parfait recipe, raspberry dessert, scottish desserts, Whisky desserts
Calories: 455 kcal
Author: Jill Colonna
Ingredients
Cranachan Parfaits
  • 4 egg yolks (organic)
  • 4 tbsp runny honey (Heather honey, if possible)
  • 1 tbsp Malt Whisky
  • 350 gr (12oz) Whipping Cream (30%) Crème fleurette
Oat Praline Crumble
  • 75 g (3oz) porridge oats
  • 75 g (3oz) granulated sugar
  • 10 g (0.5oz) unsalted butter
Shortbread
  • 200 g (7oz) unsalted butter (softened)
  • 75 g (3oz) caster sugar
  • 200 g (7oz) flour (all-purpose)
  • 75 g (3oz) rice flour (or cornflour)
  • pinch salt
  • fresh raspberries to serve
Instructions
Cranachan Parfaits
  1. Chill a large bowl in the fridge for the cream. Place the egg yolks in a large bowl, heat the honey without boiling it and pour it over the yolks and beat with electric beaters (or a stand mixer) for about 10 minutes until thick and moussy. Add the Whisky and beat again until well mixed.

  2. In the chilled bowl, whisk the cream like a Crème Chantilly until soft peaks and the same consistency as the yolk-honey mixture. Gently fold the 2 mixtures together and spoon either into spherical silicone moulds (this used 10 spheres), greased muffin tins, or in a lined cake tin. Transfer to the freezer and leave overnight to set.

Oat Praline Crumble
  1. In a saucepan, heat the sugar with a few drops of water.  Just as it starts to change colour after about 5 minutes, stir using a wooden spoon until the sugar is completely dissolved and the caramel is medium golden. Add the butter and stir to mix well then pour in the oats. Stir until the oats are well covered then immediately transfer to a baking tray.

  2. Once cool, break the praline into small pieces and reserve in a jam jar.  (This can keep for about 10 days)

Shortbread
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/360°F/Gas 4.
    Cream the butter and sugar together in a large bowl until pale and creamy (either by hand or in a stand mixer).  Gradually add the flour, rice flour and salt until the mixture comes together into a dough that's easy to work with. 

  2. Spread the mixture into a greased non-stick baking tin and thinly even it out using a palette knife. Alternatively roll the dough out with a rolling-pin until about 1cm thick and bake in the oven for about 25 minutes until golden brown. 

  3. When the mixture is still soft and warm, cut out disks with a cookie cutter (the same size as the moulds). Leave to cool on a wire tray.

To Serve
  1. When ready to serve, place the shortbread disk on each plate (spread each with raspberry jam if no fresh raspberries), turn out the frozen parfaits at the last minute and place on top.  Sprinkle with the oat praline and, if using, serve with fresh raspberries.

Recipe Notes

This recipe can be made even easier without the moulds or shortbread. Simply freeze the honey and Whisky cream in a lined cake tin overnight and slice before serving. Serve with the oat praline and a glass of single Malt Whisky.

Store the egg whites in the fridge for 3-4 days and make macarons or financiers with them (recipes in my books). Otherwise freeze the whites until later!

Jill Colonna

MadAboutMacarons.com

If you would like to try the classic, more traditional recipes for Cranachan, see my Scottish friends’ recipes, from both Christina’s Cucina and Janice’s Farmhouse Kitchen version, based on a Whisky Mac.

Cranachan parfait

Cranachan Parfait, a French twist to the Classic Scottish dessert

If you prefer to make this a gluten-free dessert then replace the shortbread with a giant pink macaron. There’s a whole chapter about giant macaron desserts, also in my book, Mad About Macarons!

Enjoy this for any Scottish occasion, or at any time of the year and ideally serve with a good single Malt Whisky.
Incidentally, the Gaelic word for cheers translates as Health, just like the French.

Cheers, Santé, Sláinte !

 

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P.S. This is part of the egg yolk recipe database, as it uses 4 yolks.  Keep the egg whites for 3-4 days in a clean jam jar in the fridge (or freeze until ready to bake) to make macarons, financiers, tuiles or meringues from my books and le blog!

Smoked Tea Beurre Blanc Salmon

As Burn’s night on 25 January approaches, my Scottish roots kick in with a sudden urge to play the bagpipes and the hunt is on to find good Scottish fare at our local market. This time I’m going savoury for ‘teatime’ with an easy yet sophisticated Smoked Tea Beurre Blanc Salmon.

Smoked tea beurre blanc salmon

It’s an Auld Alliance marriage made in heaven; it’s where saucy France hugs Scottish salmon on a plate.  Good fresh organic salmon fillets are gently pan fried and served with a rich French sauce.

However, instead of the classic beurre blanc lemon sauce, I’ve replaced it with a glossy, subtle smoky sauce that doesn’t overpower the salmon but adds that je ne sais quoi with a simple Lapsang Souchong teabag.

smoked tea beurre blanc salmon

A version of this was originally posted in July 2011 for this herb-hugging John Dory recipe.
Since I published the recipe, I’ve altered the sauce so that there’s now less liquid with the wine and cream but more butter to make the sauce glossier, creamier and richer – rather like how I wish to be this year!

healthy roast potatoes thyme

Healthy Roast Potatoes Side-dish

Serve this with lightly sautéd leeks in olive oil and healthy roast potatoes in olive oil and thyme. Simply chop up  washed, unpeeled potatoes (e.g. Charlotte) into cubes and place in a non-stick roasting tin dribbled with a little olive oil, freshly chopped thyme and season with fleur de sel salt and freshly ground pepper.  Roast at 210°C/190°C fan/410°F/Gas 6 for 30 minutes, turning them twice during cooking.

Normally I’d throw in a few garlic cloves still in their skins (en chemise), but for this dish it’s best to leave it out so not to overpower the salmon.

smoked tea beurre blanc salmon step by step recipe

Smoked Tea Beurre Blanc Salmon

Smoked Tea Beurre Blanc Salmon
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
25 mins
Infusing time
10 mins
Total Time
40 mins
 

Smoked tea beurre blanc sauce with Scottish Salmon. Simple ingredients yet a sophisticated alliance of France and Scotland on a plate using a simple Lapsang Souchong teabag.

Course: Main
Cuisine: French
Keyword: Lapsang Souchong, Salmon sauce, Scottish Salmon recipes, Smoked Tea Beurre Blanc
Servings: 6 people
Calories: 500 kcal
Author: Jill Colonna
Ingredients
  • 50 g (2oz) shallots finely chopped
  • 200 ml (7fl oz) dry white wine
  • 100 ml (4fl oz) cream (30% fat) crème fleurette
  • 1 sachet Lapsang Souchong tea
  • 150 g (5.5oz) unsalted butter chilled, diced
  • pinch salt (fleur de sel) & freshly ground pepper (to taste)
  • 6 fresh salmon fillets (@ 150 g each)
Instructions
  1. Gently fry the shallots in some of the butter for 5 minutes until translucent but not browned.

  2. Add the white wine and boil for 10 minutes until reduced by over half so that it looks a bit syrupy. Lower the heat and add the cream, stirring until well combined. Take off the heat and add the Lapsang Souchong teabag. Leave to infuse, covered, for 10-15 minutes.

  3. Remove the teabag (and shallots using a sieve if you like the sauce smooth, otherwise this step is not necessary). Return to a gentle heat and whisk in the cold diced butter gradually until the sauce is combined and glossy.

  4. Season the sauce to taste and keep on a very low heat until ready to serve. Alternatively, set aside to cool covered until ready to serve later and reheat very gently.

  5. Meanwhile, in a non-stick frying pan, sear the salmon fillets in a little olive oil for about 2-3 minutes on each side (depending on thickness), and keep warm in the preheated oven (190°C Fan/Gas 6) for a further 5 minutes.

Recipe Notes

The sauce freezes well: cool before transferring to a zip-lock bag or jam jar and defrost thoroughly before using.

Jill Colonna

MadAboutMacarons.com

smoked tea beurre blanc salmon recipe

 

Have you made any of the recipes from le blog, my books, or fancy playing the bagpipes or making this smoked tea beurre blanc salmon?  Please leave a comment below, take a picture and hashtag it #MadAboutMacarons on Instagram or Facebook – or, even better, just tell your friends about le blog!

Thanks so much for sharing or commenting – it means the world to hear you’ve made/enjoyed the recipes or just super motivation to hear you pop in and say bonjour.

healthy salmon smoked tea beurre blanc sauce

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