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Chestnut Vanilla Ice Cream

Baby it’s cold outside. I’ve been humming this song most of the week, although now we’re singing in the rain outside Paris. While singing, this Chestnut Vanilla ice cream has been churning up a light and easy dessert to finish off a big holiday menu.

chestnut vanilla ice cream

Mad About Chestnuts!

My youngest daughter is mad about chestnuts in all forms. If I mention this magic word, Lucie’s smile makes me melt quicker than the contents of this bowl. She’s obsessed about roasted chestnuts: either simply tossed along with pumpkin, bacon, or with green beans, or willing to sacrifice precious pocket money for an expensive poke at the exit of a Paris metro station.

She nibbles at luxury marrons glacés as if she was Charlie with a golden-ticketed chocolate bar, and pleads for marrons glacés macarons. She also craves the sweetened chestnut spread that is so common in France, by way of Clément Faugier. But I won’t ramble since that’s already covered in my blog post: Chestnuts! From Pancakes to Ice Cream to Macarons.

 Then I realised that I hadn’t yet posted this recipe for chestnut vanilla ice cream. Mon Dieu!

When you’re as mad about macarons as I am (and I know I’m not alone on this one – come on, own up), you need to use up plenty of egg yolks while you’re ageing your whites for making them. Ice cream is one of my favourite egg yolk recipes, as it uses up 8 yolks in this easy, classic recipe. Ideally, it’s best to have an ice cream machine. I don’t have one, but use the ice cream attachment for my Kitchen Aid that still does the job well.  If you don’t have a machine, then take the cream out of the freezer every 30 minutes (about 5 times) and mix up the partially frozen mixture well.

Chestnut vanilla ice cream with macarons

 

Chestnut Vanilla Ice Cream Recipe

Makes 1 litre

8 egg yolks
100g caster sugar
400ml whole milk
200ml whipping cream
1 vanilla pod
pinch of caramel powdered colouring (optional)
2 small 100g tins of sweetened chestnut purée (Clement Faugier)
a handful of broken marrons glacés (or whole ones if you’re feeling posh)

1. Cream together the egg yolks and sugar in a large bowl until light and fluffy.

2. Heat the milk and cream in a heavy-based pan with the vanilla pod, cut in two lengthways. Bring to the boil, and turn off the heat for the vanilla to infuse in the creamy milk for 5-10 minutes. Scrape out the seeds from the pod and add to the cream.

3. Pour the creamy milk onto the egg mixture whisking continuously. Return the mixture to the pan on a medium heat, whisking constantly until the custard thickens and coats the back of a spoon. Remove the vanilla pod and set the mixture aside to cool.

4. Once cool, place in the fridge for 1-2 hours before pouring into an ice cream maker to churn.

Serve with marrons glacés and macarons.

Chestnut Vanilla Ice Cream
Prep Time
20 mins
Cook Time
4 mins
Chilling & Freezing
4 hrs
Total Time
24 mins
 

The French love their chestnuts and so what about a sweetened chestnut vanilla ice cream to chill over the festive season?

Course: Dessert
Cuisine: French
Keyword: chestnut paste, Clement Faugier
Servings: 12
Author: Jill Colonna
Ingredients
  • 8 egg yolks
  • 100 g (3.5oz) caster sugar
  • 400 ml (14 floz) whole milk
  • 200 ml (7 floz) whipping cream
  • 1 vanilla pod
  • pinch of caramel powdered colouring optional
  • 2 (7oz) small 100g tins of sweetened chestnut purée
  • a handful of broken marrons glacés or whole ones if you're feeling posh
Instructions
  1. Cream together the egg yolks and sugar in a large bowl until light and fluffy.
  2. Heat the milk and cream in a heavy-based pan with the vanilla pod, cut in two lengthways. Bring to the boil, and turn off the heat for the vanilla to infuse in the creamy milk for 5-10 minutes. Scrape out the seeds from the pod and add to the cream.
  3. Pour the creamy milk onto the egg mixture whisking continuously. Return the mixture to the pan on a medium heat, whisking constantly until the custard thickens and coats the back of a spoon. Remove the vanilla pod and set the mixture aside to cool.
  4. Once cool, place in the fridge for 1-2 hours before pouring into an ice cream maker to churn. Then follow ice cream maker's manufacturer's instructions.

Recipe Notes

Serve with marrons glacés (candied chestnuts), crispy gavottes, almond tuiles (recipe in Teatime in Paris) or macarons.

Jill Colonna

MadAboutMacarons.com

 

Which leads me to apologise to many friends for appearing as cold as ice cream when it comes to saying hello just now. Truth be told, I’m struggling to keep up with the normal Mum duties, plus our  house renovation project. Do you find you can do nearly everything on your daily list, except there’s always at least one biggie that constantly nags at you? It’s feeling hard to please everyone. But hey, just trying to stay cool – and eat ice cream.

There are also a few upgrades currently underway on the website, since wouldn’t it be useful if you could actually do a search on the blog plus recipes and find stuff?  New pages are also coming. Bigger pics. Ouff! Lots to look forward to.

Until my next blether, macaronivores.

Bonne semaine!

chestnut vanilla ice cream recipe

Guest Recipe: Crème Caramel (Purin)

This has been a LONG week. I’m such a party-pooper since cancelled my trip to Provence this weekend en famille for my mother-in-law’s (belle maman) 70th Birthday Party. Just the thought of the TGV train and car trips back and forward is trop – too much.  The back/sacrum has played up so much that, if I sit longer than 30 minutes a stretch, I turn into a chair – just like that!

Just like that – my good friend, Nami (Namiko), author of her blog, Just One Cookbook, came to the rescue with the most perfect and best crème caramel recipe I’ve ever seen. I should say Purin recipe, as Nami is Japanese and lives with her husband (who is her blog assistant – what a team!) and gorgeous children in San Francisco.

For those of you who know Nami, I’m sure you will agree:  she not only has an amazing blog with perfect Japanese recipes and stunning presentations, but she is also one of the most genuine and sincere people I know. When you receive a comment from Nami, you can’t help feeling the need to leap out the screen and hug her for offering such encouragement.

I’m sure many of you know what I mean.  Blogging is fun but it’s also time-consuming: often when you post something into the great empty void of the w-w-web, there is nothing that can beat an adorable comment to prove that someone has not only read it, but actually liked it!  It’s what keeps the essential motivation going.

The other motivation is seeing a recipe like this to lure us into the kitchen. So let me hand you over to Nami with her gorgeous Purin recipe.  It uses up 4 lovely egg yolks…

Nami, Just One Cookbook

Hello everyone!  I’m Nami from Just One Cookbook.  I was so thrilled and delighted when Jill asked me to be her guest blogger.  I am a big fan of Jill’s beautiful macarons and love visiting her website to see what new macaron recipe she’s come up with.  Personally I don’t bake or make desserts too often but I definitely have a sweet tooth and I am also a recovering chocoholic.

As part of the “using up your egg yolk” series, I want to share a recipe for Crème Caramel and as you might have guessed it does not require an oven.  In Japan we call it Purin (it came from Pudding) and it’s definitely one of the most popular desserts.  We can buy very good-quality Crème Caramel from neighborhood convenient stores or fancy pastry shops.  My husband really loves Purin and today I’m sharing the recipe my husband said it’s the best ever.

Thank you Jill for having me over.  Cheers!

Crème Caramel (Purin)

Difficulty: Easy

Cooking Time: <45 minutes (excluding chill time)

Makes 8 servings

Ingredients:

10 g gelatin

4 Tbsp. (1/4 cup)* water

Caramel Sauce

140 g (2/3 cup) granulated sugar

4 Tbsp. (1/4 cup) water

8 Tbsp. (1/2 cup) boiling water

4 egg yolks

80 g (1/3 cup) sugar

400 ml (3/4 cup) milk

8 Tbsp. (1/2 cup) heavy whipping cream

2 tsp. vanilla

* I also added measurement in US measuring cup in parentheses, but I highly recommend using a food scale to follow this recipe precisely.

Directions:

1. In a small bowl, combine gelatin and water and set aside.

2. In a small saucepan, combine sugar and water.  Caramelize the mixture on medium heat.  Shake the pan once in a while but you don’t need to stir with spoon.  Patiently wait until it turns into a nice caramelized color.

3. When you see nice (dark) golden caramelized color, immediately pour ½ cup of boiling water because it will quickly get darker and darker (resulting in bitter taste).  Make sure to wear a kitchen mitten so you won’t get burnt from the hot liquid splashing.  Remove from heat.

4. Quickly soak the ramekins under warm water so sugar doesn’t solidify right away.  Pour the caramel sauce in the ramekins.

5. In a large bowl, combine egg yolks and sugar and whisk until it becomes creamy and smooth (That’s my husband mixing it up.  I asked my husband to be my assistant while I took pictures).

6. Meanwhile in a small saucepan, bring half of milk (200 ml) to a boil.  Remove from heat right before it starts to boil.

7. Slowly stir in a few drops of the hot milk at a time into the egg mixture and mix together.  Do not pour milk at once as the hot milk could cook the egg mixture and make it lumpy.  Whisk all together.

8. Pour the mixture back into the small saucepan.  Heat the mixture on low heat and whisk until it’s completely blended.

9. Once it gets warm again, add the gelatin and mix. Make sure it melts completely. When the gelatin is completely mixed in, remove from the heat.

10. Pour the mixture over the sieve into the clean bowl.

11. Prepare iced water in a larger bowl and place the mixture bowl inside.

12. Add the rest of the milk (200 ml), heavy whipping cream, and vanilla.  Mix all together well.

13. Pour the mixture into the ramekins, and chill in the fridge for more than 1 hour.

14. After chilled, insert knife around the Crème Caramel and flip the ramekin on to the serving plate.  If it doesn’t come down, hold the ramekin like this (below) and shake once vigorously.  You should hear the Crème Caramel drop on the plate.

Enjoy!

My husband and my kids like lighter caramel sauce but I personally like dark and bitter caramel sauce like this…

 

Nami’s Crème Caramel (Purin)

When you caramelize, make sure not to make it really dark, because it will be too bitter.

Don’t you just love it? You can imagine what her savoury dishes are like if she doesn’t make desserts that often, my goodness. Nami is also a self confessed “recovering chocoholic”? Well, after Nami’s beautiful dessert I think I’ll have to admit that I’m not just a macaronivore but also a crème-carameloholic.  Thank you so much for sharing it with us and these beautiful photos.  Don’t forget to pop over to Nami’s blog, Just One Cookbook, and say cheers from me!  This week she has been making the most outstanding Japanese fish recipes.