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Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas

Are you more trick or treat? These Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas have been creeping up on me with the weather changing around Paris, the nights suddenly drawing in and clocks changing this weekend.

From black liquorice macarons to fun, surprise flavours or simply spooky – take your pick and join the party.

Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas Liquorice

Liquorice macarons from ‘Mad About Macarons’

Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas

Create a one-eyed monster’s bloodshot look using black and pink edible pens.

Smarties are great for making quick and easy edible eyes. Stick them on with a dab of melted chocolate – see bottom photograph of the Witch’s Hat Macaron Tower, as even too much chocolate ‘glue’ can make them look like black eyes!

Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas Green Eye

If you’re not into spooky and prefer to enjoy seasonal Autumnal flavours, then check out the recipe for these Pumpkin Spice Macarons with Roasted Red Kuri Squash (potimarron).

Unlike the macarons in my books, this filling recipe can be eaten the day they are made. Many pumpkin macarons just use pumpkin spice but these ones actually contain delicious roasted pumpkin – with a good hint of spice too. If you’re looking for pumpkin recipes, there are plenty here, including these Pumpkin, Sage and Parmesan Financiers – great with Hallowe’en party drinks.

Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas pumpkin spice

Last week when I was visiting Julie in London (yes, she has flown the nest to study there), I couldn’t resist popping into Fortnum and Mason’s to check out the macaron display (do you really believe I go in there JUST for macarons?). They have some Hallowe’en treats with names like Pick your Poison.

These skeleton faces, done using a stencil for large quantities, are fabulous. However, for smaller quantities at home it’s just as easy to draw them on by hand.

Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas skeletons

Create your own simple spooky faces using a jet black edible pen – available in all good specialist cake shops. For a list of stockists, see the annexes in my books or here on the FAQ page.

Incidentally, if you have any of your favourite stores with good quality products, leave me a comment below and I’ll update the stockists page here for you.

Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas

I’m not much of an artist but if you are, then I’m sure you can do more elaborate Hallowe’en decorations on your macarons.

These macarons are to die for: Pistachio, Coconut and Wasabi Macarons.  The recipe is in Mad About Macarons.

Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas - spicy wasabi

Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas with Pistachio, Coconut and Wasabi Macarons

Although it looks like a whopping load of wasabi in the ganache recipe, the right dosage of white chocolate, coconut cream, vanilla and pistachio makes a perfect Hallowe’en concoction. The surprising mixture cuts out the fire just leaving the hint of wasabi behind on the tongue (I should have made the smartie tongues green, I know! You’ll do a better job.)

If you haven’t tried them yet, then what are you waiting for?

Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas Glitter

Brush on some edible glitter (lustre) – such as bronze or deep pink – to make your macarons extra shiny. They’re particularly good on salted caramel, rose and chocolate macarons.

Element of Halloween Macaron Surprise

Add some extra exploding sugar (sucre pétillant) to top these already fizzy Orangina or Fanta macarons. The recipe is in Teatime in Paris and is easily adaptable to make Coca-Cola macarons too, making it a spookily black filling!

Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas

Savoury Macarons: Witch One?

Mini savoury macarons create a real element of surprise (found in a whole chapter in Mad About Macarons). Have you tried the curry tikka mac’sala mini macs with curried cauliflower soup, for example? Curry macarons are great fun served with drinks – partnered with a Gin & Tonic for an adult Hallowe’en party!

Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas Savoury

Mini Savoury Macarons – Witch one is it?

The Colour Purple

Replace orange carrots with purple carrots (I talk about them here in this purple carrot cake) in this (Purple) Carrot, Parsnip and Coriander Soup (believe me, it’s delicious but the colour is VERY deep purple; I should have showed it last Hallowe’en on Instagram, as it shocked some people in February!) and serve with mini beetroot and horseradish macarons, also good with a fun and fiery beet risotto.

Beet and horseradish risotto with red wine and a savoury macaron

There are also Bloody Mary macarons or Thai Green or Red curry macarons to choose from for a real trick AND treat.

Meanwhile, back to the sweet side, these spider macarons are far from creepy. Just cut up some liquorice shoe-lace or coils (do they have a proper name in English?) and stick them into the ganache before placing the macaron shell on top. Marzipan stuck with melted chocolate also helps make Mummie macarons.

Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas

How to make a macaron tower, from ‘Teatime in Paris’.

Have you made any of the recipes from le blog, my books, or fancy sharing any of these Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas?  Please leave a comment below or take a picture and hashtag it #MadAboutMacarons on Instagram or Facebook.

A Hallowe’en Macaron Birthday Party!

Did you know that Mad About Macarons is heading for its 10th reprint? What a thrilling way to celebrate its 8th birthday, so THANK YOU with all my heart for your support: for following, for liking, for taking the time to comment and for leaving a review. It means so much. So, cheers to you for joining the party – I love to see you enjoying the recipes!

Top 10 Halloween Macaron Ideas

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Pumpkin Spice Macarons & Roasted Red Kuri Squash Filling

I’m back! And to make up for it I’m presenting you with these pumpkin spice macarons!

Oof! It has been a real marathon so it’s good to be back finally on le blog. These past few months have been  challenging. Juggling the stress of house renovations, a new bricolage world of riveting French DIY vocabulary has blossomed and I’ve even dabbled in some interior design (I made the plans for my office). I realised all this work has left its mark when I found myself glancing at the paint and tile colours in a few Parisian pâtisseries before the cakes!

The most exciting project, of course, has been preparing the new book: writing, recipe testing and taking hundreds of photos … all around teatime. I can’t wait to share its progress with you very soon but as it’s now going through edits and design with Waverley Books, I finally have an excuse to take a tea break and make some pumpkin spice macarons, strictly for le blog and perfect for Autumn!

Pumpkin spice Parisian macarons

I’ve never really understood why the French don’t seem to be that much into pumpkin. Last week at the market in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, I even had a lovely French seller – complete with chic body warmer, hair tied back with scarf – ask ME (yes, I kept pinching myself it was unreal) how to cook mini pumpkins (Jack-be-littles) rather than show them off as decorative items for Autumn.

Pumpkin Purée and Pumpkin Spice

For sweet recipes, there isn’t any pumpkin purée in the French shops, an ingredient that appears to be familiar with most of my American blogger friends at this time of year.  When I looked up some macaron recipes, there wasn’t even any pumpkin in them – instead simply ‘pumpkin pie spice’, another ingredient that’s difficult to find here.  So there was only one thing for it: to make my own pumpkin purée and find a quick spicy alternative.

potimarron or red kuru squash spiced macarons

Potimarron Pumpkins

I set out to grab a giant quarter slice of pumpkin, as they’re normally sold here. With Hallowe’en gradually becoming more popular here with youngsters, giant Jack-o’-lanterns are also more available than before, ready to carve for this Friday’s spooky date.  This year, pumpkins seem to be overshadowed by the smaller potimarron, The Autumn foodie fashion item in the French supermarkets and at our local farmers’ markets just outside Paris.  They’re everywhere!

What’s Potimarron in English? Apparently it’s Red Kuri, Japanese Squash or Orange Hokkaido.  It’s darker than pumpkin without the ridges and has a more intense, even chestnut-like texture and flavour (as the French name implies: marron, meaning chestnut).  What I love about it is, unlike pumpkin, you can even eat the skin!

pumpkin spiced Japanese squash macarons

I remembered a post by David Lebovitz about how to roast potimarron or red kuri squash: he dribbled olive oil over the slices, added herbs and roasted in the oven for 20-30 minutes at 200°C.  I tried this method using potimarron in my favourite pumpkin, leek and ginger soup and it really is delicious.

Inspiration knocked for these pumpkin spice macarons when David mentioned that the Red Kuri squash slices could also be roasted with brown sugar and cinnamon. Instead I used pain d’épices or gingerbread spice, perhaps the French’s closest quick answer to pumpkin pie spice (cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger & all-spice powder).  And in case some of you have hands up in horror, wondering why there are no Hallowe’en decorations on these macarons – I’m ridiculously scared of spiders and anything in the least bit squirmish; perhaps I grew up with too many Scottish ghost stories!

roasted red kuri or Japanese squash

Roast me in the oven for nearly 30 mins, covered in brown sugar, pumpkin spice and top with foil

Macaron Fruit Fillings – A Tip!

One word about using fruit purées for macaron fillings: it can make macarons become rather soggy.  One tip is to add ground almonds (almond flour) to soak up the juices which I’ve done here.  The good news with this recipe is that for impatient macaronivores, you can eat this macaron after only 6 hours in the fridge and finish them the next day.  Any longer and they will turn slightly soggy – but the taste is divine and full of healthy, spicy squash! I wouldn’t recommend keeping the pumpkin spice macarons any longer than 2 days or even freezing them as you would for all the macaron recipes in my book.  If you prefer to keep them longer like in the book, use equal quantities of purée, melted white chocolate and whipping cream.

Colouring the meringue for making pumpkin macaron shells

Instructions on how to make the macaron shells are given step-by-step in both my books, Mad About Macarons! and Teatime in Paris! Just add a dash of powdered colouring (I use a pinch of red and yellow) and a teaspoon of pumpkin spice or pain d’épices to the meringue.

pumpkin spice macaron filling with red kuri squash

Top me off with a macaron shell and I’m yours!


Pumpkin Spice Macarons:
Filling with Roasted Red Kuri

This recipe is ideal for serving later in the day.  Just chill in the fridge for 6 hours.  Best eaten within a couple of days. The basic French recipe for macaron shells are well explained in both Mad About Macarons! and Teatime in Paris! (150g egg whites for about 40 macarons).

Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: max 35 minutes
Chilling time: min 1 hour

For roasting:

1/2 red kuri squash or Potimarron
2 tbsps brown sugar
3 tsps pumpkin spice or pain d’épices

Cream:

2g sheet of gelatine
2 egg yolks
50g brown sugar
50g whipping cream
100g roasted red kuri purée (half of one red kuri)
2 tsps pumpkin spice or pain d’épices
2 tbsps ground almonds (almond flour)
100g chilled mascarpone

1.  Preheat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan.  Cut the kuri squash in 2 and, using only half of it, scoop out the seeds.  Cut into slices and place on a non-stick baking sheet, sprinkling with the brown sugar and spice.  Cover with aluminium foil and roast in the oven for about 20-30 minutes, depending on the size of the slices.  When ready, set aside to cool then purée using a mixer or by hand with a masher.  Weigh out 100g of purée.

2.  For the cream, soak the gelatine in cold water for about 15 minutes.  In a bowl, hand-whisk the yolks and sugar until creamy.  Heat the cream in a saucepan until nearly boiling, then whisk into the yolk mixture then transfer back to the pan over a medium heat, whisking constantly until the sauce thickens (rather like a pastry cream).

3.  Take off the heat, add the gelatine (squeeze of excess water) to the warm cream, whisking until melted then add the purée, ground almonds and spice.  Set aside to cool then chill for about an hour.

4.  Hand-whisk in the mascarpone then transfer the cream to a piping bag with a 1cm plain tip.  Pipe onto half of the shells then assemble with the remaining macaron shell tops and chill in the fridge.

pumpkin spice macarons potimarron red kuri squash

Are you planning to make spooky macarons for Hallowe’en?

Why not share your pumpkin spice macaron – or Hallowe’en inspired macarons with us?  Post them on the Mad About Macarons Facebook page or tag me on Instagram (@madaboutmacarons).  It’s always exciting to see you baking the recipes from my books.

Happy macaron-making!

French Macarons for Hallowe’en

How many shop windows are dressed up for Hallowe’en in your neighbourhood?  No doubt there are plenty, especially if you’re in the US or UK. In France, Hallowe’en is still pretty much seen as overly commercial, so you won’t find much ghoulishness going on in shop fronts. In our local chocolateries in St Germain-en-Laye, it’s more autumnal scenes rather than witches. Just check out the chocolate pumpkin sculptures by Chocolatier genius, Patrick Roger.

Chocolatier, Patrick Roger’s Hallowe’en

As for trick ‘n’ treating, this is still fairly new here – just try and find some fancy-dress costumes. Apart from the odd standard outfit at Carrefour (our major hypermarket), there’s not much else. If I was the perfect Mum, I’d make my children’s costumes but if you know me, I’d rather stick needles in my fingers (which usually happens anyway!)

Eye spy – I see a leetle witch in ze window…

Our French neighbours are not much Hallowe’en spirited, either. I know some who pretend they’re not in (yes, I know who you are.) The poor souls must spend the evening in the dark, whispering to each other in fear of being caught by a local young witch, demanding her annual sweet ration.

White chocolate sculpture, Salon du Chocolat, Paris

Who can blame them?  The first year in our new neighbourhood it was all quiet until a group of teenagers rang (not even dressed up, but then their Mums didn’t make their costumes, poor darlings), demanding sweets as my children opened the door. I shoved on a witch’s hat and growled in grumpy French that they needed to earn their ration by singing a song or something. It’s spooky: they just took to their heels.

Wouldn’t you do the same? When we were children in Scotland, it was the done thing to have a party-piece.

So this Hallowe’en, here are some magnificent macarons as party pieces to share with you from my macaronivore friends via the website and Facebook page.

Pumpkin spiced chocolate macarons by Joshua Burgin

Here, Joshua Burgin added some pumpkin spice to the shells and also to the dark chocolate ganache for his spiced pumpkin and dark chocolate macarons.

We have many pumpkin inspired macarons.  Let’s face it, Hallowe’en without pumpkins is like a Scottish castle without ghosts. Makeitpopsweets used a spicy pumpkin filling for a touch of Hallowe’en.

Pumpkin macarons by Makeitpopsweets

Also on a pumpkin theme, Michèle Faubert, macaronivore extraordinaire, came up with pumpkin and Jamaican spice macarons, using chocolate in the shells and pumpkin spice in the filling.

Extra heat for Hallowe’en by Michèle Faubert

Here’s some cobweb macaron decor from Waverley Book’s Editor, Eleanor Abraham.

Plus perhaps all of our biggest fear and eventual nightmare: Eleanor made a beautiful batch of macarons and just as she was finished, most of them slipped off the plate she was carrying and crashed to the floor. This has to be the most horrific of Hallowe’en macarons!

Also by Michèle Faubert, feast your googly eyes on these macarons…

Just look at her ghoooooulish macaron eyes for Hallowe’en.  Booooooh!

And I suppose you’re expecting me to have a party piece too, after all that? Not too hallowe’enish, but these fangs are partial to lemon-ginger macarons.

I’m still on a liquorice macaron phase (Antoine has claimed even more after making some pink liquorice allsort macarons for Mactweets.) I added a touch of mint to the filling (recipe on p74 of the book.)  It gave that extra hint of chill to them – just what was needed.

Extra chilly with liquorice and mint

Happy Hallowe’en to you and

wishing you plenty of macarons in your goody bags!