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Asparagus Clafoutis with Parmesan Sauce

You heard me right: this isn’t a classic French cherry clafoutis but an ASPARAGUS CLAFOUTIS.

We are totally mad about French Clafoutis every summer. It’s such an easy custardy classic dark cherry dessert – but it’s also just as delicious made with fresh raspberries – or my latest addictive craze, a gluten free version with strawberries.

However, if you haven’t tried a savoury clafoutis yet, I urge you to try this Asparagus Clafoutis! It’s delicate and divine.

Update: See me demonstrate how to make this on my new YouTube channel here.

Asparagus Clafoutis

White Asparagus Clafoutis Recipe

You may recall I tried out this gorgeous large custardy version of a White Asparagus Clafoutis recipe inspired by chef, Eric Frechon from the Bristol in Paris. It’s served in one big dish.

White Asparagus French Clafoutis

White Asparagus French Clafoutis

Since then I’ve played around with the recipe to serve it as a starter – this time with less yolks, adding lemon (optional – but really delicious with white asparagus), and serving with a most incredible yet easy parmesan sauce.

Lemon Asparagus Clafoutis

Asparagus Clafoutis

Serve as Individual Portions for a Touch of French Elegance

I also love to serve them as INDIVIDUAL PORTIONS – it’s perfect for entertaining or wanting to show that you’ve made that little bit extra effort for a dinner party or special occasion.

This turns a simple family dish into a wowzer summery lunch or light starter.

How to prepare asparagus

Stacked as they are sold at our local market

A Perfect Light Lunch

Just before serving, dribble a little olive oil and some lemon juice over the asparagus. While the clafoutis are creamy enough on their own, you can add some lemon zest to the batter, and forget the parmesan sauce for a lighter version – great for those on a summer diet!

Lemon Asparagus Clafoutis

Green Asparagus Clafoutis with Parmesan Sauce

Not everyone, surprisingly, seems to be in love with white asparagus, as I’ve discovered via your comments on Facebook and Instagram.

Instead, the printable recipe below is for a green asparagus clafoutis – without the lemon but served with the most silky, creamy parmesan sauce that you can mop up with a crusty baguette.

The addition of a parmesan sauce with an asparagus clafoutis just takes it to another level! It’s so good, you may decide to double the quantity!

Parisian Inspiration

This time last year, I was kindly invited to take part in a pilot run for Parisian cookery classes with Chef Philippe Excoffier in Paris’s 7th arrondissement, where I wrote up an article about the delicious experience.

Chef Excoffier showed us how to prepare asparagus, telling us there was nothing to beat the old-fashioned traditional way and to remove the pedoncules or spikes to make digestion easier. He also served his legendary cheese soufflés – the Soufflés Suissesse. I strongly recommend trying out his signature dish in his restaurant in rue de l’Exposition, near the Eiffel Tower.

Asparagus Clafoutis

Remove the pedoncules or spikes to make asparagus easier to digest

Asparagus with Parmesan Sauce: A Marriage in Heaven!

Clafoutis is not exactly the most stylish looking of dishes and not to be confused with a soufflé.  While a soufflé stays upright and puffy, made with bechamel and whisking up the egg whites, the much easier clafoutis falls back down after cooling from the oven – there’s nothing to worry about when that happens: it’s totally normal and as it should be!

Chef Excoffier added a parmesan sauce to his soufflés and I find that this adapted version compliments the Asparagus Clafoutis so well.  Although the clafoutis are already creamy inside and light, this cheesy addition means saucing it all up with the freshest French baguette (the French even have use the verb, ‘saucer’ to wipe the end of the sauce with the bread – it’s that good!).

Asparagus Clafoutis

Serve them directly in their pots, to make it even easier!

 

Asparagus Clafoutis with parmesan sauce

 

Have you made any of the recipes from le blog or fancy making this asparagus clafoutis recipe?  Please do leave a comment below or take a picture and let me know you’ve made it via Instagram and Facebook. Enjoy the recipe!

French Asparagus Clafoutis with Parmesan Sauce

5 from 12 votes
Asparagus Clafoutis Recipe
Asparagus Clafoutis with Parmesan Sauce
Prep Time
30 mins
Cook Time
25 mins
Total Time
55 mins
 

A perfect elegant yet simple dinner starter or light summer lunch served with crusty French baguettes to mop up the most silky creamy parmesan sauce.

Course: Appetizer, Brunch, Light Lunch, Starter, Supper
Cuisine: French
Keyword: asparagus recipes, french asparagus recipe, savoury clafoutis recipe
Calories: 395 kcal
Author: Jill Colonna
Ingredients
  • 500 g (1 lb) fresh asparagus (2 bunches)
  • 3 eggs organic
  • 2 egg yolks organic
  • 15 g (1 tbsp) all-purpose flour (or 1/2 tbsp cornflour to make this gluten-free)
  • 115 ml (4fl oz) half-fat single cream (I use 12% fat cream)
  • 55 g (2oz) matured parmesan cheese finely grated (about 2/3 cup)
  • good pinch each salt and pepper to taste
Parmesan Sauce
  • 55 g (2oz) matured parmesan cheese finely grated
  • 140 ml (5 fl oz) half-fat single cream (1/4 pint)
  • good pinch each ground nutmeg, salt & pepper
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C/360°F/160°C fan/Gas 4.  Prepare 4 ramekin oven dishes (or 6 muffin moulds) by greasing them well with softened butter. 
    Snap the asparagus spears about 1/4 off the bottom, where they break naturally. Peel or scrape them as close as possible to the spear heads then cut the spears into 3.

  2. Fill a large pan with water and bring to a rolling boil.  Add a generous heaped teaspoon of salt to the cooking water. Prepare a large bowl of (preferably iced) cold water.

  3. Cook the asparagus for 3 minutes (no more than 4 minutes if they're more chunky). Remove with a slotted spoon and immediately transfer to the cold water to stop the cooking process.

  4. Prepare the clafoutis batter: beat the eggs, yolks, grated parmesan, flour and season with salt and pepper.

  5. Drain the asparagus, setting aside a spear top per person for the decor and one spear top each for the clafoutis. Place the rest of the asparagus in a food processor and mix to a purée with some of the batter.

  6. Stir in the puréed asparagus to the rest of the batter. Pour into the individual buttered ramekin dishes/muffin moulds, placing a spear top in each. Alternatively, pour into one buttered ovenproof dish, throwing in the rest of the spears. Bake in the oven for about 25-30 minutes (35 mins for a large clafoutis).

  7. Remove from the oven and leave to cool for 10-15 minutes, then using a sharp knife, release the clafoutis from around the edges and place directly on the serving plates.

For the Parmesan Sauce:
  1. Bring the cream to the boil, adding some salt, pepper and a pinch of ground nutmeg.  Add the parmesan then beat together well until smooth with a balloon whisk. Serve immediately around each clafoutis.

Recipe Notes

Decorate with an asparagus spear, a basil top or edible flowers.  Also delicious with smoked salmon. Serve with a crusty French baguette.

I used 4 ramekin dishes but regular muffin moulds also work well, including briochette silicone moulds (makes 6 generous portions).

Wine Suggestions: Serve with a fruity white wine - such as a Voignier (Condrieu a real treat!), a dry Muscat or Riesling from Alsace, or Chenin from the Loire (Savennières).

Jill Colonna

MadAboutMacarons.com

French Asparagus Clafoutis

French Apple Crumble Cake

How on earth could a simple apple crumble take me so long to find the correct name to fit this recipe? I’ve called this a French Apple Crumble Cake, yet it’s without the cake bit.

French Apple Crumble Cake

French Apple Dessert Inspiration

With an abundance of French apples this Autumn, I wanted a classic yet healthy apple dessert.
This recipe “Le Gâteau aux Petits Lu®” of Danièle Thompson caught my eye in Philippe Conticini and Pascal Frey’s compilation of nostalgic desserts by French celebrities in “Souvenirs Gourmands” (bought at their book launch in 2015 at the Pâtisserie des Rêves in Paris).

Danièle’s gâteau is genius. It’s basically a crumble with unsugared, lightly spiced apples. It’s given le French Touch by layering apple compote with a biscuit crumble in a rectangle or ring and left to chill in cake shape for 24 hours.

C’est tout.

Oat and almond toasted crumble

Well not quite.

Instead of using ready-made commercial biscuits, I made my own favourite Scottish oat crumble topping. So, does this make it an ‘Apple Crisp’, as it contains brown sugar and oats? Hmm. I’ve added ground almonds too.

Oat & Nut Crumble

This isn’t anything astounding, though, is it? As a Scot, it’s understandable we like adding porridge oats to  crumble toppings – as you can see from this simple apple oat crumble dessert. Moreover, the (optional) nutty addition of almonds adds more texture and flavour. Pudding proof is adding ground hazelnuts in this wicked chocolate hazelnut pear crumble.

Gingerbread spiced apple lemon compote

Naturally Sweet Apple Compote

The compote could be made purely with a sticky vanilla pod or bean but I love Danièle’s addition of pain d’épice/gingerbread spice. In this case, I had the French gingerbread spices to hand (cloves, cinnamon, cardamom, star anise) and so infused them into the bubbling lemon juice and apples.

So, what do I love most about this French Apple Crumble Cake? The choice of naturally sweet apples (Golden Delicious and Pink Lady) means there’s no need to add any sugar to the fruit. The result is sweet enough and it’s healthy too!

layering oat crumble with spiced apple compote

French Apple Crumble ‘Cake’

This isn’t really a French ‘cake’. Unlike apple crumble cakes on the web, this is rather more of a cake look-a-like.  In France, a “cake” is a transportable rectangular cake made with flour and it’s designed to rise (e.g. Banana Chocolate Marble Cake).

Instead, this French Apple Crumble Cake just rises to the occasion for teatime, dessert – or even breakfast or brunch and let’s even add it to the Thanksgiving table. It’s really a French gâteau but translated into English sounds awfully complicated. So I’m sticking with cake! Without the cake. Jings, now I’m making it sound complicated – but it’s just the delicious subtleties of the language.

French Apple Crumble Cake

Can I replace the Apples with other Fruits?

Keep it simple. Stick with apples rather than alternating with other fruits, as the compote should stay compact and avoid being too liquid.  Replace an apple with a pear at most but keep it at that to enjoy this recipe at its best. Using Granny Smith apples are good but remember they’re tart and would require some sugar.  Like in Danièle’s  original recipe, use a mix of Golden Delicious (I love how the French pronounce  them as “Gaulden“) and Pink Lady, as they’re the easiest to work with and naturally sweet.

Can I make it Gluten Free or Vegan?

This recipe is relatively low in gluten but if you want to omit the flour completely to make this completely gluten free, double the amount of oats and ground almonds. To make this recipe vegan, replace the butter with your favourite non-dairy spread or melted coconut oil for the best vegan crumble topping.

Can I freeze it?

I don’t recommend freezing it as, although possible, the crumble will become not as crisp and – dare I say such a horrible word in baking? Soggy. So let’s keep it crumbly crisp and serve simply chilled. Speaking of which, I do stress that the cake needs to chill for 24 hours in order to keep its perfect shape and eaten at its best on the day.

French Apple Crumble Cake Ice Cream

How to serve French Apple Crumble Cake

This French Apple Crumble Cake is excellent served simply on its own, as the French tend to do.  However, for many of us who love that little extra luxury on the side, a drizzling of caramel au beurre salé (see my salted caramel sauce recipe) would be perfect with a dollop of good crème fraîche.
If we want to be British about it, add custard – or try this lightly spiced French chilled custard, Chai Tea Crème Anglaise. For ice cream lovers, chestnut ice cream is a perfect Autumnal or Winter treat.
Alternatively, serve with the lot if you plan to make this for a perfect, fruity Thanksgiving dessert!
JINGS – I have it!  Let’s call it Thanksgiving Apple Crumble.

More Apple Dessert Recipes:

Sticky Toffee Apple Pudding

Alsatian Apple Custard Tart

Individual Apple Rose Tatins

Classic French Tarte Tatin

Gingerbread, Apple & Salted Caramel Trifles

Cheat’s Danish Apple Cake by FabFood4All

Toffee Apple Hazelnut Cake by Tin&Thyme

Persimmon Apple Crumble with Rum Sauce by Christina’s Cucina

 

French Apple Crumble Cake

French Apple Crumble Cake Recipe

5 from 3 votes
French Apple Crumble Cake
French Apple Crumble Cake
Prep Time
25 mins
Cook Time
35 mins
Chilling Time
1 d
Total Time
1 hr
 

A chilled healthy Apple crumble style cake - served chilled with a naturally sweet and spiced apple compote sandwiched between an oat and almond crumble

Course: Brunch, Dessert, teatime
Cuisine: British, French, Scottish
Keyword: apple crisp cake, apple crumble cake,, baking with oats, healthy apple desserts
Servings: 6 people
Calories: 436 kcal
Author: Jill Colonna
Ingredients
Crumble
  • 100 g (3.5oz) butter (room temperature)
  • 50 g (1.75oz) coconut sugar or muscovado sugar
  • 100 g (3.5oz) plain flour (all purpose)
  • 50 g (1.75oz) medium rolled oats
  • 50 g (1.75oz) ground almonds (almond flour)
Apple Compote (Gingerbread-spiced)
  • 1 kg (2lb 3oz) apples 3 Golden Delicious, 2 Pink Lady
  • 1 vanilla pod (or 1tsp vanilla powder)
  • 1 star anise
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 cloves
  • 4 cardamom pods
  • 1 lemon, juice only
  • 1/4 tsp fleur de sel (a pinch)
Instructions
Make the Crumble:
  1. Preheat the oven to 190°C/170°C fan/375°F/Gas 5

  2. Combine all the crumble ingredients an a large bowl, lightly rubbing through your fingertips until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Set aside. (I often make double quantities of crumble and at this point freeze the other half for an extra speedy dessert next time!)

  3. Spread evenly on to a baking sheet covered in baking parchment or with a silicone mat. Bake for about 15 minutes, until the crumble is golden brown. Set aside to cool.

Make the Apple Compote:
  1. Peel and cut the apples into small cubes. Put all the ingredients in a saucepan, cover and heat gently for about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally until the apples have become soft (I love keeping a few bits still visible for texture). Set aside to cool.

Preparing the Apple Crumble Cake:
  1. Butter a 20cm cake ring or springform cake tin (or 20cm x 8cm rectangle) and place directly on the serving plate. Sprinkle half of the cooled crumble mix evenly on the bottom, then spoon all the apple compote evenly. Top with the rest of the crumble and transfer to the fridge for 24 hours. Lift off the cake ring or take off the springform tin (this is so much easier than it sounds!)

Recipe Notes

Serve chilled on its own with a dusting of icing/confectioner's sugar. Also good with warmed salted caramel sauce, chilled Chai Crème Anglaise (or at room temperature) or candied chestnut ice cream or a good old blob of crème fraîche.

Jill Colonna

MadAboutMacarons.com

Crispy Sesame Tuiles

Truth be told, I was planning all sorts of French travel posts and recipes lately but have been so tired after radiation treatment, I’ve things left aside until after the holidays. Yesterday, however, I did make these Crispy Sesame Tuiles for teatime, simply as they were so quick to make: they’re made in only 30 minutes!

I experimented using the basic Almond Tuiles recipe in my book, Teatime in Paris. Not only did they work using sesame seeds but they were so delicious, we couldn’t stop eating them! The bonus? They can keep even longer in a biscuit tin – if you can resist the temptation.

SEE THE VIDEO 

HERE

Crispy Sesame Tuiles

Sesame Seeds – High in Calcium

Why Sesame Tuiles? Well, for the last 4 months, I’ve had trouble balancing calcium levels following the removal of my thyroid – and especially parathyroid glands. Even if you don’t have thyroid issues, we need calcium in our diet for healthy bones. Sesame seeds are naturally high in calcium, so I’ve been sprinkling them on more or less everything: on breakfast oat granola, on my favourite goat’s cheese salade de chevre chaud, soups like corn chowder and grilled Béarnaise chicken. It has worked!

Then yesterday, I just thought, why not replace the almonds with sesame seeds in my favourite, easy-and-fast-to-make teatime Tuiles? They’re even crispier and not as sweet as the classic French biscuits.

sesame tuiles

Whether you need more calcium or not in your diet, I urge you to try them: you’ll discover that Crispy Sesame Tuiles are also rather compulsive eating. What’s more – YOU NEED ONLY 2 EGG WHITES!

Sesame Tuiles

How Can I Serve Sesame Tuiles?

Crispy sesame tuiles are not just great on their own for teatime. Here are some ideas to serve with some of our favourite desserts:

In the recipe I have used white sesame seeds but try black sesame too. What about serving sesame tuiles with this Black Sesame ice cream, inspired by our gourmet visit to Japan last summer.

Sesame tuiles ice cream
Read more on our experience of Teatime in Japan here.

Crispy Sesame Tuiles

5 from 8 votes
Sesame Tuiles Best Recipe
Crispy Sesame Tuiles
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
8 mins
Cooling Time
4 mins
Total Time
22 mins
 

A variation of French Tuiles (literally 'roof tiles' by their biscuit shape) using sesame seeds instead of almonds - and high in calcium. Recipe adapted from French almond Tuiles from my book, Teatime in Paris.

Course: Dessert, teatime
Cuisine: French
Keyword: teatime recipes
Servings: 9 people
Calories: 162 kcal
Author: Jill Colonna
Ingredients
  • 70 g (2.5oz) Egg whites from 2 eggs
  • 65 g (2.25oz) cane sugar (or granulated sugar)
  • 65 g (2.25oz) butter melted
  • 35 g (1.25oz) plain flour (all-purpose)
  • 65 g (2.25oz) sesame seeds
  • pinch salt (fleur de sel)
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/170°C fan/gas 5.

  2. Place all the ingredients in a bowl and stir together with a spoon until well combined.

  3. Line 2 baking sheets with baking paper or a silicone mat and spoon the mixture into oval discs - using the back of a spoon - to about 6cm (2.5") in diameter.

  4. Bake in separate batches* (one tray at a time) in the oven for 8 minutes - keep your eye on them, as they cook fast. They should be toasted around the edges and cooked but golden in the middle.

  5. Straight from the oven, transfer each flat tuile (using a palet knife or pie slice) to a rolling pin to shape them to their tuile - or roof-tile - shape. Otherwise transfer to a wire rack to cool for 4 minutes.

Recipe Notes

Enjoy the tuiles freshly made, otherwise eat within 2 days if stored in an airtight container.

* If not using all the batter, keep covered in the fridge for 2-3 days.

Jill Colonna

MadAboutMacarons.com

Crispy Sesame Tuiles

Crispy Sesame Tuiles

Rose Rhubarb Orange Cake

If you love rhubarb, you’ll fall in love with this French Rose Rhubarb Orange cake.  It’s on the same lines as this  easy sticky almond and lemon cake yet made extra moist with a little rhubarb pre-roasted in fresh orange with a subtle hint of rose. The welcome timing of rose and rhubarb season is also perfect for celebrating Mother’s Day.

Rose Rhubarb Orange Cake

Rhubarb & Rose Recipes

By now, you may have noticed I adore rhubarb and rose together. I even wear a French perfume of the two together – it’s glorious. To taste the two, have you tried this rhubarb and rose sorbet or this rhubarb, rose and hibiscus jam?

It doesn’t just stop at roses: in my second book, ‘Teatime in Paris‘, I also have a recipe for Rhubarb and Poppy macarons. Poppy is a particularly French sentimental flavour, associated with French childhood bonbons or sweeties (you’ll find the extract in speciality stores, such as Deco Relief in Paris. See stockists here.) I loved discovering that it totally worked with rhubarb.

Rose Rhubarb Orange Cake

A Yearlong Tip for Rhubarb Fans

For fans that find the rhubarb season FAR TOO SHORT, make batches of this delicious rhubarb compote and freeze it in jam jars.  I often make it without the ginger, infusing a fruity hibiscus teabag in it to pink it up and add a touch of rose water. So, when rhubarb is well out of season, omit the roasted rhubarb step in this Rose Rhubarb Orange Cake and serve it with your defrosted rhubarb compote – it’s the best combination ever!

What’s more, this cake is pure heaven served with rose macarons, lemon or almond macarons (recipes in Mad About Macarons) – or sublime with rose and orange blossom macarons (recipe in Teatime in Paris).

While developing the recipe, I based it on the lines of a French financier style teacake (also in Teatime in Paris) but reduced the butter and added egg whites to lighten it up a bit for a bigger cake. It’s also reduced in sugar as much as I dare but, of course add a little more, if you do prefer it slightly sweeter.

Rose Rhubarb Orange Cake

French Rose Rhubarb Orange Cake

More Rhubarb Recipes

My Grandpa’s favourite pudding was Rhubarb and Custard and there’s nothing much to beat it, especially with delicious memories of growing up in Scotland.  We loved putting ginger with rhubarb, from jams to compotes, but the various combinations or just pure rhubarb on its own is fabulous.  Check out my UK blogger friends’ rhubarb recipes too – they also write out their recipes by weight (grams/ounces):

rose rhubarb orange cake

Rose Rhubarb Orange Cake

Rhubarb, Rose and Orange Cake
Prep Time
20 mins
Cook Time
17 mins
Total Time
37 mins
 

Celebrate rhubarb and rose season with this financier style rose rhubarb orange cake, an easy French teatime treat with reduced sugar, making it also ideal for breakfast or brunch - or dessert served with rhubarb compote and some rose macarons.

Course: Breakfast, Dessert, teatime
Cuisine: French
Keyword: French rhubarb cake, rhubarb cake, rhubarb financier, rhubarb recipes, rhubarb rose orange
Servings: 12 people
Calories: 270 kcal
Author: Jill Colonna
Ingredients
Roasted Rhubarb with Rose and Orange
  • 2 sticks rhubarb, cut into small pieces
  • 1 large unwaxed orange, juice (organic)
  • 1 tsp rose water
  • 1 tsp of the grated zest (below)
  • 2 tbsp cane sugar
Almond Cake
  • 110 g (4oz) butter, softened (unsalted)
  • 100 g (3.5oz) sugar
  • zest from 1 large unwaxed orange organic
  • 2 large eggs organic
  • 75 g (3oz) egg whites (from 2 eggs)
  • 200 g (7oz) ground almonds (almond flour)
  • 35 g (1.5oz) plain flour (all-purpose)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • slivered almonds, for sprinkling (optional)
Instructions
Roasted Rhubarb
  1. Preheat oven to 180°C/160°Cfan/360°F/Gas 4.  Line a 23cm non-stick cake tin with parchment paper.

  2. Wash rhubarb, cutting off the extremities and cut into 5cm sticks. Place in a non-stick roasting tin with 1tsp of the orange zest and all the juice. Add rose water and sprinkle over rhubarb with cane sugar. Roast until soft for 10 minutes. Set aside to cool.

Almond Cake
  1. In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until pale and fluffy - either using a ballon whisk o mix together in a mixer.

  2. Gradually whisk in the orange zest, eggs, whites, ground almonds, flour, baking powder until mixed together.

  3. Place the roasted rhubarb in the bottom of the cake tin and top with the mixture.  Sprinkle over the slivered almonds, if using, and bake for 25-30 minutes until golden.

  4. Leave to cool in the cake tin for 10 minutes then remove and cool on a wire rack.  Brush over the rhubarb, orange and rose juices from the roasting tin onto the cake.

Recipe Notes

Store in a cool, dry place. Can keep for up to 5 days and also good for freezing.  Excellent served for breakfast or teatime with rhubarb compote.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION: 270 Calories per portion; 6g protein; 17g carbohydrates; 20g fat.

Jill Colonna

MadAboutMacarons.com

Are you on Pinterest? Then pin this for later. Sending you sweet wishes and peony roses from Paris!

Rose Rhubarb Orange Cake

Chocolate Hazelnut Pear Crumble

What is it with crumble that it looks so totally not sexy in photos? This Chocolate Hazelnut Pear Crumble has taken me so long to post because of the images but in the end, I gave up and these photos will have to do. All that matters is the recipe – your proof is in the pudding!

chocolate hazelnut pear crumble

This Chocolate Hazelnut Pear Crumble is so quick to make and ticks all the autumn-winter-spring pear comfort-food dessert boxes. We love this not just for dessert but any leftovers are pounced on for breakfast, weekend brunch and – typically French – for teatime too as a crrrrumbeulle with a pot of tea.

Comice pears Parisian market

All throughout Autumn and Winter, we’ve had a constant supply of ripe-firm pears at our local market, which are just right for this crumble.  In February, and now in March, they’re still going strong! For this recipe I use Comice pears but you can use Williams, Conference – any of the winter varieties.

Pears, Apples and Chocolate Heaven

chocolate hazelnut pear crumble recipe method

As I was developing the recipe, I found that adding some apple helped soak up the juices, as pears for a crumble do tend to be rather wet and juicy, which could make it a bit soggy if used on their own.  However, the mixture of the two together and cooking them lightly at the beginning will prove to be just right.

Chocolate hazelnut pear crumble method

Healthy Crumble with Oats

To make this recipe a little less in gluten than my classic apple crumble, I’ve replaced some of the flour with oats and the hazelnuts just add that incredible flavour.  It’s like having a homemade Nutella crumble but much healthier.

Although I add unsweetened cacao powder to the hazelnut crumble, the real secret is hidden underneath: good quality dark bittersweet chocolate (at least 64% cacao), in cooking disks or grated, just merges in to the fruit. It’s a perfect marriage in a baking dish.

Chocolate Hazelnut Pear Crumble

This one is ready to go in the oven. Just ensure that the chocolate and fruit are hidden underneath the crumble.

More Crumble Love

If you love crumbles, have you tried these yet?

More Pear Recipes

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chocolate hazelnut pear crumble

Chocolate Hazelnut Pear Crumble

Chocolate Hazelnut Pear Crumble
Prep Time
20 mins
Cook Time
30 mins
Total Time
50 mins
 

An easy chocolate oat crumble that's a great compromise for a family dessert with fruit - the ultimate comfort-food with extra dark chocolate and lower in gluten than the classic crumble.

Course: Breakfast, Brunch, Dessert, teatime
Cuisine: British, French
Keyword: baking with oats, chocolate crumble, chocolate hazelnut recipes, eggless baking, low gluten, pear recipes
Servings: 8 people
Calories: 318 kcal
Author: Jill Colonna
Ingredients
Chocolate Hazelnut Crumble
  • 50 g (2oz) Ground Hazelnuts
  • 50 g (2oz) Plain (all purpose) flour
  • 75 g (3oz) medium oats (porridge oats)
  • 2 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 100 g (4oz) butter unsalted
  • 1 good pinch salt (fleur de sel)
  • 40 g (1.5oz) soft light brown sugar (cane sugar)
Fruity Filling
  • 10 g (0.5oz) unsalted butter
  • 3 firm to ripe Large Williams or Comice pears peeled, cored, chopped
  • 5-6 Granny Smith apples peeled, cored, chopped
  • 10 g (0.5oz) vanilla sugar or cane sugar with 1/2 tsp vanilla powder
  • 50 g (2oz) dark bittersweet chocolate (min 64%) (good quality, in button form or grated)
Instructions
  1. Combine all the crumble ingredients in a large bowl, lightly rubbing through your fingertips until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Set aside.

  2. Preheat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/400°F/Gas 6.
  3. Peel, core and chop up the apples and pears roughly into chunks. Melt the butter in a large non-stick frying pan, toss in the fruit chunks and sprinkle over the vanilla sugar. Leave to cook over a medium heat, turning the apples and pears now and again, for about 5-8 minutes. The fruit should not be mushy, just lightly cooked. Drain off any excess fruit juice if there is any (set aside and reduce over medium heat to serve apart with the crumble later so that there's no waste).

  4. Transfer the fruit to a gratin or pudding dish (no need to butter it) and scatter over the dark chocolate. Sprinkle on a generous amount of crumble until the fruit and chocolate are completely covered.

  5. Bake for about 25 minutes, or until the top is toasted or lightly browned. Leave to cool slightly before serving.

Recipe Notes

Serve warm or at room temperature.

Replace the dark chocolate with milk chocolate according to taste.

Although fresh pears are best for this recipe, tinned pears are also great!

We normally serve this chocolate hazelnut pear crumble on its own but if you prefer, add some vanilla ice cream, pouring cream or an adult boozy ice cream such as this non-churn Calvados ice cream (replace the Drambuie with Calvados).

Jill Colonna

MadAboutMacarons.com

Chocolate Hazelnut Pear Crumble

 

Chocolate Ginger Fondant Cake

Who likes the combination of chocolate and ginger? After making a huge batch of chocolate ginger macarons, I had to share this Chocolate Ginger Fondant Cake – a family favourite with a wee kick to it. It’s such a quick and versatile French classic that lends itself to all sorts of delicious flavour alliances.

Chocolate Ginger Fondant Cake

What’s more, it tastes even better next day! So, even although it’s quick to make, prepare this fondant a day before serving and you’re already prepared for tomorrow’s dessert.

French Fondant Classic

There’s nothing really mind-boggling new really. Based on a classic French flourless chocolate cake, a speciality of the Aquitaine region, the ratio is normally the equivalent amount (200g) of good quality dark (bittersweet) chocolate, butter and sugar with 4-5 eggs.

Over the years, however, I’ve lowered the sugar to appreciate the chocolate better – and, ever since I discovered Trish Deseine’s idea of adding just a tablespoon of flour “as an afterthought” (from her wonderful book, Nobody Does it Better), I’ve used this version and cut down the sugar. If you prefer to keep this cake gluten free, then omit the flour (or replace with almond flour).

This is my family’s favourite version with lowered sugar and added candied ginger.

chocolate ginger macaron

Candied Ginger

Have I told you before about the fantastic candied (glacé) ginger we can get in France? The best hails from the market town of Apt in the Luberon (Provence), where it’s the world Capital of Candied Fruits. Apt Union is the address if you’re heading in that direction. Buy by the kilo, as it’s great value for money (incidentally, I see they only deliver in France). If you can’t find it, no worries – use stem ginger in syrup. It tends to be a lot hotter, so thinly slice it and add only as much as you dare! (update: I see you can buy candied ginger from Trader Joe’s, Amazon and Walmart in the USA)

Add candied ginger to chocolate macarons (as I do in the recipe in Mad About Macarons) and it’s the best surprise ever to bite into the middle of a fudgy, fondant macaron.

Back to the fondant cake!

Add That Extra Touch to Chocolate

As with many plain chocolate fondant cakes (including those chocolate coffee individual fondants), I adore melting a teaspoon of coffee granules into the chocolate.  It brings out the earthiness of the chocolate and renders it extra smooth. If you prefer without the coffee, a couple of good pinches of salt (fleur de sel) is just as good, as I use in this recipe.

For spice lovers who want to go the full monty, then add a good pinch of cayenne pepper – you’ll see: bittersweet dark chocolate with cayenne is incredible!

chocolate ginger fondant cake

Adding candied ginger to the bottom of the cake tin – the result is it hides into the chocolate – totally melt-in-the-mouth

Chocolate Ginger Fondant Cake
Prep Time
20 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Cooling time
20 mins
Total Time
40 mins
 

A deliciously fondant dark, bittersweet fudgy chocolate cake with candied ginger for that extra kick - a French classic which can easily be turned into a gluten-free dessert by replacing the spoonful of flour with almond flour. Best made in advance and served next day at room temperature.

Course: Dessert, teatime
Cuisine: French
Keyword: bittersweet fudgy chocolate cake, chocolate fondant, French chocolate fondant recipe, quick chocolate cake
Servings: 8 people
Calories: 454 kcal
Author: Jill Colonna
Ingredients
  • 200 g (7oz) dark (bittersweet) chocolate No less than 60% cacao
  • 200 g (7oz) unsalted butter cut roughly into cubes
  • 150 g (5.5oz) sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt (fleur de sel) (or tsp coffee granules if making a plain chocolate cake)*
  • 5 organic eggs (medium)
  • 1 tbsp plain (all-purpose) flour if gluten free, replace with almond flour
  • 50 g (2oz) candied ginger (or one stem ginger in syrup, sliced)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 180°C/160°C fan/360°F/Gas 4.
    Grease a round cake tin (25cm/10 inch) and line with cooking parchment.

  2. Over a pot of simmering water, place the chocolate and butter in a heatproof bowl (bain-marie) and melt the chocolate gently for about 10 minutes.

  3. As soon as the chocolate and butter have melted, take off the heat. Add the sugar and mix together with a spoon, gradually add the eggs and then add the flour, mixing until just combined.

  4. Place the candied ginger at the bottom of the cake tin then pour over the chocolate mixture and bake for 20 minutes.

  5. Remove from the oven (don't worry if it looks uneven, it will flatten out while cooling) and leave to cool for about 20 minutes then turn out of the tin on to a serving plate.

Recipe Notes

Nutritional Information per serving:

454 Calories; 6g protein; 35g Carbohydrates; 32g fat.

Serve with the Chai Tea Crème Anglaise or with a dollop of Drambuie ice cream for a special occasion - or simply on its own.

* add a couple of pinches of cayenne pepper for that extra subtle dynamite.

Jill Colonna

MadAboutMacarons.com

chocolate ginger fondant cake

Serving Suggestions for Chocolate Ginger Fondant Cake

Either serve on its own slightly warmed or at room temperature with vanilla ice cream, Drambuie ice cream or Parisian restaurant style with a classic vanilla Crème Anglaise.

Even better, this Chai Tea Creme Anglaise is the perfect match with just enough warming spice to complement the chocolate ginger fondant cake.

chocolate ginger fondant cake

Have you made any of the recipes from le blog, my books, or fancy making this Chocolate Ginger Fondant Cake?  Please leave a comment below or take a picture and hashtag it #MadAboutMacarons and share it on Instagram or Facebook . Even better, spread the word; tell your friends or family about the website.

THANK YOU so much for sharing the recipes!

chocolate ginger fondant cake

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Teatime in Paris by Jill Colonna

Photo courtesy of Waverley Books

Personal Gifts

Don’t forget that both recipe books, Mad About Macarons and Teatime in Paris (my personal favourite, as it’s macaron recipes plus pastries too), are great gifts. If you grab your copy now, I can send you a personalised label to stick inside either book.

Just let me know by getting in touch privately via this contact form with your address details, what you’d like me to say in particular, and I’ll send it out to you with the warmest of wishes!